The Strangest Flower Ever!

Lifesavers. You know the little addictive, brightly colored circle candy? Well, when I saw this odd flower with the name Lifesaver cactus, I just had to get one. I ordered online in August and put it in a south window. It’s near my purple LED boost light, too.

I can’t decide if it’s pretty or weird. It reminds me of Saguaro cactus blooms- the weird wax look.

Then, I got to thinking about some of my other cactus blooms this summer. I was so busy chasing daylilies that I likely didn’t post many of these.

Yucca bloom after a wet spring in my yard.

Pincushion Cactus flower.

White Desert Rose bloom.

Easter Lily Cactus bloom.

Rebloom on my Easter Cactus.

Thanksgiving Cactus bloom.

Orchid Cactus bloom.

Cactus flowers are stunning things. There reproductive parts look like a universe in and of themselves. Or, a chorus of ballet dancers. They don’t ever last long. Maybe longer than a daylily. Or, not. But, I have to admit, I’ve never seen anything quite like this Lifesaver bloom.

Lifesaver Cactus

I’m hopeful that I’ll see more cactus and succulent flowers this winter while the daylilies reat.

Kokopelli has Landed!

Kokopelli has made history as the first daylily bloom of 2018!  In Native American folklore, the Kokopelli turns winter to summer (and visa versa).  Today, Kokopelli brought thunderstorms . . . badly needed thunderstorms to our exceptional drought area.  Chilly, overcast.  When I first went out this AM, it was hot and dry, now it is cool and 60s.  I hope she brings more rain.

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Kokopelli was my first Ned Roberts daylily.  Now, my Southwest garden bulges with them. I have around 66 Roberts cultivators – most with southwestern names in my Southwestern Garden.  I have just over 75 cultivators in the Southwest Garden.  What bonds the is names from the Southwest US.  They live with some big yucca out in that garden, and a Kokopelli sculpture.

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Last year, I had about 15 different cultivators bloom in the Southwest Garden.  Not such a great rate out of 75.  That meant I needed to make changes.  My soil here is heavy clay with roots embedded.  We don’t get much rain, even on a good year.  So, that is when I started looking around and noticing that my potted cultivators did better.  Therefore, I dug up around 60 of the daylilies in the Southwest Garden, put them in better soil in a quick draining container, and buried the container.  Broke a rib and got sciatica in the process.

But, it seems to be paying off because I now have 20 cultivators in scape out there!  It is early in the season so I only have 8 scapes in all my other gardens combined.  Last fall, I had the elm tree that cast shade on the Southwest Garden removed.  I also added a soak hose watering system.  20 in scape by 6/3. . . I can’t believe my eyes.  It is the first time I ever had my first bloom from out there, too.

So, once the elm was a stump, I had to figure out what do with said stump.  I decided on a native garden.  It is raised on one side and slopes down so that the yucca that have been under the tree for years could be part of the new garden.  It has sage, Morman tea, ornamental grass, cactus, and several zeroscape flowers.  Today, I want to share photos of the current bloomers – neighbors to the Southwest Garden.  The new garden is the Hovenweep Garden.

 

 

PS – Next up is Orange Flurry – maybe tomorrow.  Who knows what a cool, rainy day might bring?

 

Upward Spirals

The daylily garden is my happy place.  Gardening brings a feeling of flow – or a loss of self.  And, with daylilies, my optimism, curiosity, creativity, and appreciation of nature strengths kick in, bringing a sense of joy.

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And, today must have been extra nice because I managed to take 30 pictures with only 4 cultivators in bloom.  Well, and I snuck in a couple shots of my mini sunflowers, Mexican daylilies (shellflowers), and my confused amaryllis (yes, it is about to bloom in my yard).

It was a nice daylily day, though, despite the small number in bloom.  First of all, Western Sandstone bloomed for the first time ever in my yard.  This one was ordered the first year I was doing roots . . . 2014?  And, so it is a gardener’s triumph!  A pretty one, too.  (pictured below)

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So, back to the happy place.  There is some good science that says we need 3 positives for every negative (emotion/event) to flourish.  Or, somewhere around that number. When we flourish, we broaden and build resources.  A month or two ago, I was feeling weighed down in some stuff that was creating an amazing negative spiral out of life.  Having the daylilies to focus on is hugely therapeutic.  No wonder the longest lived populations all garden!!! No wonder we call it “flourishing.”

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Tomorrow, maybe Pizza Crust will bring a smile.  Or, my silly amaryllis 🙂

The wild, the tamed, and a daylily

Tomorrow, I head home to daylilies and puppies.  I am glad I came. A few more hours checked off. New knowledge.  Tonight,  I share the last flower pictures from the high Rockies ecosystem.  Tomorrow,  it’s back to the Colorado Plateau.

The wild:

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The tamed:

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And one lone Stella (?) amongst the city’s landscaping.

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The rest are unbloomed scapes. My yard may be behind, but it’s clearly ahead of the highlands. What blooms will I find tomorrow?  I don’t even have a Stella in my yard.