It is Better than Therapy!

Here I am, finishing up my doctorate and still waiting for the next door to open.  My knuckles get raw from knocking.  They said it would open doors, and I need to stay optimistic, positive.

The garden helps.  And, the blog is to be my happy place, so I won’t dwell on bloody knuckles here.  I will say that when I left my computer to go put compost and manure in my daylily pots (some needed to be replanted do to settling), my mood shifted.  I was focused in the moment.  Painting daylily tiles does the same thing. Flow.  Loss of time, self. So, hey, what a blessing these guys are to grow.  It is more than the blooms . . . it is the cycle of life.

Today was my last Pizza Crust for the year.  It is a lot prettier later in the day to me.  So, this was actually taken in the evening.  Have to savor the last one.

 

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Pizza Crust – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

And. Stella.  She seems to be taking a break before sending new scapes . . . and I have 3 of her.  So, I shall be patient.

 

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Golden Stella – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

I still have Frans Hals, Heirloom Heaven, and Red Hot Returns. And, a few new plantings on the way . . . big, classy spiders.  I just love them with the yucca.  As Tom Hanks said in Castaway – Let’s see what the tide brings in tomorrow.  A new bloom, an interview, a porta-potty?  Here is to optimism!

 

Prepping the Daylily Beds is a Bunch of BS!

So, first there are the first fans of spring.  Actually, other than my garlic and spring bulbs, one of the very first signs of spring in my yard.  Then, there come the scapes followed by peak bloom season.  And, then the lovely late bloomers signal time to start preparing for another cycle.  I think of the Native Americans and their focus on the changing seasons.

I did have bloomers this weekend.  So, I will show those first, followed by the tale of BS in my garden.

Tiger Kitten only produced two buds.  This was a one fan root last summer. It’s making progress.  Can’t wait for next year!

 

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Tiger Kitten – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

Stella, of course, was here with me all weekend, in both yellow and gold.

 

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Yella Stella – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

 

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Orange Stella – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

And, Orange Flurry lit up my smaller zeriscape garden in the rocks.

 

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Orange Flurry – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

So, here is my Ned Roberts Southwest spider garden that I put in this spring.  The first two pictures are before.  It is of note on the second photo that the earth no longer comes up to the top of the bricks.  PS – I would have done a higher raised bed, but the yuccas won.

 

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Ned Roberts Southwest spider patch (before) – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

 

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Note the level of the soil and mulch within the bricks.

 

Here is the after picture.  Probably no different to most people.  The difference is that the earth is now back up to the top of the brick.  Because daylilies are funny about planting depth, this meant raising the grade of the garden by first loosening up each daylily, putting the growing medium underneath, and then surrounding each cultivator with the medium.  It reminds me of the tale of raising Galveston Island several feet after the 1900 Great Storm.  They did it one structure at a time, too. It took all afternoon yesterday.

 

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Southwest lily patch (after) – a lot of work for something that looks pretty much the same.  Just ask the daylilies, though, it has been a weekend of prep for a new season.

 

Today, I filled the gaps with the remaining medium because the daylilies were all in mounds after being raised.  Sounds easy enough, except I was mixing up a concoction of steer manure, compost, peat moss, water crystals, soil acidifier, and time release fertilizer.  Oh, and given that I tromp around pretty hard with my camera, I also added some little stepping stones so the soil could stay fluffy.   I think my motivation is not only the anticipation of the blooms (a type of savoring), but also the number of little gardens that I see on my dog walks that have gone untended.  I think how cool the initial intention was . . . . but it is long gone.   This Colorado Plateau is a different ecosystem than the South.

I read yesterday that with plenty of water, amendments, and the right amount of fertilizer you can get 2-3 x as many blooms.  Might as well give it a shot.  For tomorrow, we will talk about grass weeds vs daylily sprouts.  Maybe someone out there can help me with that issue!!!

 

My Last Ned Roberts Spider :-(

Skinwalker adorned my yard with its last bloom for 2016.  My Ned Roberts and Southwestern named daylily garden is off to a good start.  I had 10 blooms out of that garden this year.  There are 50 or so cultivators out there.  More on that in a minute.

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Other late bloomers were Apache Uprising.  I think I have one more bud to go.

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And, Yella Stella.  She has a brand new scape, so I am still hopeful to make it to freeze. Plus, Red Hot Returns (sounds like a political statement to me) and Heirloom Heaven have still not bloomed.  Heirloom Heaven is a ways off, too, from the scape size.  September?

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OK, so back to my Ned Roberts garden.  I carefully built it over spring break, moving buckets of rocks and pebbles that had been there for decades.  Then, I dug down deeper, a few inches down into the clay soil.  And, I added the brick border.   I then filled it with good soil and water crystals.  Then, I planted the daylilies.

Now, the earth has settled and the roots are too close to the clay for best production, me thinks.  Tomorrow, I gently lift each cultivator up, hopefully without totally dislodging roots, and I fill in with compost, manure, peat, and more good dirt.  Back up to the top of the bricks.  And, then re-mulch it.  Optimistically, that boosts the year two bloom.  I think garden spaces take a while to be fertile.  It took my garlic patch a few seasons.  Good dirt rocks!