Daylily Photobombs

The peak lives on with 72 blooms today.  One of the things about photographing so many daylilies before I have to leave for work is that I get in a rush.  I focus on the flower and hit the shutter button.  Sometimes, when I am editing later, I find stuff that I didn’t notice at the time.

My favorite photobombs have other daylilies that I didn’t notice in the background – like Happy Hopi today:

HappyHopi7.26.2.jpg

Happy Hopi with friends Laughing Feather and Zuni Thunderbird 7/26

And, the most common photobombs are when I cut off a petal in the shot by a lot.  Why am I struggling to get photos of Navajo Grey Hills?

NavajoGreyHills7.26.2.jpg

Navajo Grey Hills 7/26

Of course, there are occasionally cat photobombs:

SkinWalker7.25.1.jpg

Skinwalker and my cat, Sokasbai – 7/25

Or, dog photobombs:

BlueBeat7.25.1.jpg

Blue Beat and my dog, Maizzy – 7/25

The most embarrassing, though, are the foot photobombs.  The flower is at a weird angle, so you try to bend over so you can get a front shot.  What was I thinking?

BlackIce7.26.1.jpg

Black Ice and my feet – 7/26

OK – so what about Premiers.  Only three today.  The pace slows a bit, although I saw my neighbors at dinner and the first thing they talked about was my giant daylilies.  So, it isn’t over yet!

Nona’s Garnet Spider was a bonus.  She hasn’t been a consistent bloomer but is putting on a good show of buds this year.

NonasSpider7.26.1.jpg

Nona’s Garnet Spider – 7/26

Autumn Jewels . . . I think this was a bonus, too.  She is related to El Desperado.  I had a huge El Desperado for years but lost it to the weird, cold, wet spring.  I lost a couple and several had setbacks . . . but so many are blooming this year that haven’t before or the regulars have a higher bud count than usual.  It’s interesting the yin and yang of this year.  Anyway – I got a new El Desperado and it is just putting up scapes now.  I like both of these cultivators.

AutumnJewels7.26.2.jpg

Autumn Jewels – 7/26

And, Nearly Wild is another bonus plant – she looks like her ancestor, the ditch lily or Fulva.  I am sure that is where she gets her name.

NearlyWild7.26.2.jpg

Nearly Wild – 7/26

It is raining, again.  We will see what that brings.

 

 

Born to Be (Nearly) Wild!

Last night it rained.  It has been overcast all day, and now it is raining, again.  It is a good weekend to dig daylilies and put them in pots.  It is not a good weekend to chill with my dogs at the brewery.  Or, go camping!

So, I did have a new bloom today.  Her name is Nearly Wild.   And she held up pretty well to the rain and sprinkler.

NearlyWild3.7.29.jpg

I am fairly sure she is named for the ditch lily, Fulva, that is the original American daylily.  It was brought to the US from Asia in the 19th century as an ornamental flower. It grows along ditches in certain areas of the country, and (unlike most daylilies we grow today) has rhizomes that make it invasive.   You can order it, but it comes with a black box warning that it is invasive!  But, it does look like Nearly Wild, don’t you think?

FulvaDitchLily.jpg

OK – so the pot moving took most of the day.  So far, 43 moved and 13 to go.  Of the 13, 10 are still in bloom or have scapes.  So, tomorrow is a much shorter day with that piece. Plus, I am starting to do some dividing, so may do a bit of that tomorrow.  The cool weather makes a good time to do this part.   Probably more so than camping.