Mapping Daylilies

Perhaps it is a bit premature to start my “between the seasons” chores. However, the best time to update my garden map was with several of the cultivators in bloom. It is funny what I forget when they aren’t blooming and look like a cross between grass and a spider plant. So, I printed off the old map and thought it would be a few adjustments. However, the garden grew and changed over the years and the numbering system was confusing – so I started from scratch.

Garden maps are great, though. You know what you have and what you don’t have. You know approximately where your cultivators are – so when that bloom you don’t remember pops up, you can figure out what it is (esp if you lost the label.

Anyway, back to the blooms – I had 3 very different premiers today.

El Desperado 7.17 – This was actually the first cultivator I had in the Southwest Garden (that was much smaller and just had yucca. I put it in a pot and set it out there with no water system other than my watering can. Suffice it to say, she didn’t flourish. I moved her and she did fine but up and died a couple years ago, so this is a replacement. She taught me that I needed irrigation out there before I tried daylilies in that spot, again. Now, there are 79.
Oh Erica 7.17 – This is a new addition to the family garden this year. I found the daylily by searching the family member’s name but couldn’t find it for sale. I found the hybridizer and he sold me the fans. I hope she does OK – she looks a little but eaten.
Purple Many Faces 7.17 – Pretty late for a premier bloom from this Roberts spider. It usually blooms early July. IDK – moving to the pot – also the drought – she was very slot to start this spring due to looking very dry.

Finales included a lot of big yellow-white flowers today. Sad to see them go.

Heavenly Curls finale 7.17 – She had her best bloom year ever, though!
Ghost Ranch finale 7.17 – She only had 2 buds so one premier and one finale. Glad I ordered more.
Papa Longlegs finale 7.17 – He also had a good bloom year.
Hopi Jewel finale 7.17 – I think of her as an earlier bloomer so it is unusual to still have her blooming.
Coral Taco finale 7.16 – I missed her yesterday
Prelude to Love finale 7.17

Only about 36 hours until I head for New Mexico for a few days – to see a Truchas sunrise and visit Ghost Ranch – Oh, and drive the Enchanted Circle in the land of enchantment.

The Amazingly Huge Spiders of August

Oh, my – school starts tomorrow.  I worked early and late.  My daylilies had 12 hours between my first round of photos and my second.

I am not sure what to say tonight – my brain is mush and I crave ice cream.  But, I do want to highlight three big, colorfast Ned Roberts spiders that are late bloomers.  Colorfast becomes obvious when we photograph at 7 AM and 7 PM.  And, my photos of these three look good both times – wide awake all day.

Purple Corn Dancer steals my heart with every bloom.  I have her in two locations so I may get 3-4 weeks of blooms.

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Purple Corn Dancer 8/13/1

Mama Cuna is a HUGE spider.  She, also, wears make-up that lasts all day – she adds an amazing highlight to the Southwest garden late season.

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Mama Cuna 8/13

Purple Thunderbird is CRAZY HUGE – and also looks great all day.  Very colorfast.

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Purple Tunderbird 8/12

I am guessing they are related because they all make me smile.

PS – My orchid cactus did not bloom last night – this waiting is the stuff of my midwifery days!  I even got up briefly at 3 AM to check.

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Orchid Cactus bud 8/12

My Favorite!

This day started before the sun.  Trying to photograph daylilies right after the sun rises is futile – or at least not productive.  I had 30 in bloom on this first day of faculty meetings.  I had to finish photos this evening because daylilies look sad when the bud is only a little open.

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Anyway – This is a short blog because I am tired and tomorrow is another 5:30 wake-up.  I am a late bloomer, so my bud is only half-open when I get to work.  But . . . I have to blog because my favorite daylily showed-up today!  Purple Corn Dancer was my premier today.  I don’t know why I like that bloom so much, but I do.  So, tonight let the Corn Dancer enjoy center stage.  I’ll see you tomorrow!

Prepping the Daylily Beds is a Bunch of BS!

So, first there are the first fans of spring.  Actually, other than my garlic and spring bulbs, one of the very first signs of spring in my yard.  Then, there come the scapes followed by peak bloom season.  And, then the lovely late bloomers signal time to start preparing for another cycle.  I think of the Native Americans and their focus on the changing seasons.

I did have bloomers this weekend.  So, I will show those first, followed by the tale of BS in my garden.

Tiger Kitten only produced two buds.  This was a one fan root last summer. It’s making progress.  Can’t wait for next year!

 

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Tiger Kitten – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

Stella, of course, was here with me all weekend, in both yellow and gold.

 

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Yella Stella – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

 

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Orange Stella – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

And, Orange Flurry lit up my smaller zeriscape garden in the rocks.

 

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Orange Flurry – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

So, here is my Ned Roberts Southwest spider garden that I put in this spring.  The first two pictures are before.  It is of note on the second photo that the earth no longer comes up to the top of the bricks.  PS – I would have done a higher raised bed, but the yuccas won.

 

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Ned Roberts Southwest spider patch (before) – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

 

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Note the level of the soil and mulch within the bricks.

 

Here is the after picture.  Probably no different to most people.  The difference is that the earth is now back up to the top of the brick.  Because daylilies are funny about planting depth, this meant raising the grade of the garden by first loosening up each daylily, putting the growing medium underneath, and then surrounding each cultivator with the medium.  It reminds me of the tale of raising Galveston Island several feet after the 1900 Great Storm.  They did it one structure at a time, too. It took all afternoon yesterday.

 

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Southwest lily patch (after) – a lot of work for something that looks pretty much the same.  Just ask the daylilies, though, it has been a weekend of prep for a new season.

 

Today, I filled the gaps with the remaining medium because the daylilies were all in mounds after being raised.  Sounds easy enough, except I was mixing up a concoction of steer manure, compost, peat moss, water crystals, soil acidifier, and time release fertilizer.  Oh, and given that I tromp around pretty hard with my camera, I also added some little stepping stones so the soil could stay fluffy.   I think my motivation is not only the anticipation of the blooms (a type of savoring), but also the number of little gardens that I see on my dog walks that have gone untended.  I think how cool the initial intention was . . . . but it is long gone.   This Colorado Plateau is a different ecosystem than the South.

I read yesterday that with plenty of water, amendments, and the right amount of fertilizer you can get 2-3 x as many blooms.  Might as well give it a shot.  For tomorrow, we will talk about grass weeds vs daylily sprouts.  Maybe someone out there can help me with that issue!!!

 

Return a Smile :-)

Today, no new blooms.  I am impressed, however, that Return a Smile returned.  It’s the one I divided into the front garden last year.  It has never rebloomed in the container.  That is cool.  The old gal has grit.

 

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Return a Smile: Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

In my positive psychology course, we are talking about how we tend to mimic the faces of those who we make eye-to-eye contact with.  Smiling does usually get returned.  And, they are calling this a form of love.  So, I will credit my daylily for reminding me of that lesson today.

I decided to update my collage of Roberts daylilies that bloomed this year, as I think Ghost Ranch may be the last.  I am still hopeful for late bloomers, but no scapes yet.  This can always be updated. If I get 80% next year, It will be 40 or so cultivators.

 

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Ned Roberts Spiders as of 7/29/2016 L to R: Top Row – Winds of Love, Black Ice, Aztec Firebird, Chief Four Fingers, Desert Icicle. Center: Skinwalker.  Bottom Row: Ghost Ranch, Kokopelli, Dream Catcher, Zuni Thunderbird, Dream Keeper.

 

And, here is the collage of today’s blooms.  Gratitude . . .  Love, joy, and gratitude.  A garden of positive emotion.

 

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7/29/16 L to R: Top Row: Fine Time Lucille, Lullaby Baby, Dream Catcher, Baja, Return a Smile.  Bottom Row: Orange Vols, El Desperado, Ghost Ranch, Marque Moon, Prelude to Love.