Jazzed!

Wow! I haven’t blogged since school started nearly 2 weeks ago? I’m not really surprised. It’s overwhelming to be short of faculty and it never seems to stop. On top of that, there was my daylily repotting project 2 weekends ago (20 of 70 done) and camping last weekend. Twenty more this weekend.

Purple Corn Dancer 8.19.20

I have four buds left – all Purple Corn Dancer. It is really winding down. With the drought – I hold little hope of rebloom, even from the yellow trumpets. So, why and I jazzed? Because there is LOTS of new growth in several of the daylilies I repotted two weeks ago.

Purple Thunderbird 8.19.20

The season shifts. Now, my daylilies are plants to be nurtured. This is a great time to put out a little growth because first freeze is still 5 weeks or so away and the days will be warm enough until mid to late October for the cultivators to grow into the next season. Then, will come the snow . . and mulching . . . and freezing temps. I won’t pay much attention to the daylilies – maybe genealogy and movies to pass the dreary hours of being reliant on my furnace for comfort. A few pots will move to the back porch for the winter- my barometer on spring is watching the porch lilies. Then, finally, the porch lilies have enough growth to move outside in late February and little by little the green appears. Then, it is time to sit on the porch, again – and hope for scapes to show soon. After that, three months of bloom season and heat. And, after that, the cycle begins anew. Let’s hope for a little rain and moisture in all of that.

Navajo Curls 8.20.20

The Sun, and the Rain, and the Daylily Roots

When it comes to places to live, I stay on the sunny side.  This place west of the Divide and east of the desert is not the habitat of daylilies.  They are go-getters, though.  I have only lost one or two of all those that I put in last year.  Some act pretty shocked for a bit.  Like, hey, we aren’t in Georgia anymore, Toto.   So, below is my city’s annual precipitation from city-data.com – we are a couple standard deviations below the mean.

And, below are the sunshine days.  Here, we are close to a couple standard deviations above the mean.  Desert daylilies.

The downside of this climate, along with the very base ph, clay soil, is that it is nothing like the natural daylily habitat.  It is trial and error.  And some stuff you don’t get to see the results from for a year.  And, so, today I finished putting my mulch concoction on my main flower garden cultivators.  We will see if this helps.  Not that I did poorly this year, but Stephanie Returns didn’t return.  In fact, she only had one scape.  She is not the only one who is below her mean.  So, let’s hope this mulching is more than just a load of BS.

A few blooms to go with the calluses, sunburn, and bug bites.  Two of my last three Pizza Crust buds:

 

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Pizza Crust – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

And, my Stellas.  Yeez, I wish those gals could help with yard work.

 

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Yella Stella – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

 

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Golden Stella – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

PS – Heirloom Heaven is close – and has another brand new scape.  Hopefully, the mulching won’t hurt these little buds.  I think Red Hot Returns is very close, too.  Tomorrow ????

 

 

Prepping the Daylily Beds is a Bunch of BS!

So, first there are the first fans of spring.  Actually, other than my garlic and spring bulbs, one of the very first signs of spring in my yard.  Then, there come the scapes followed by peak bloom season.  And, then the lovely late bloomers signal time to start preparing for another cycle.  I think of the Native Americans and their focus on the changing seasons.

I did have bloomers this weekend.  So, I will show those first, followed by the tale of BS in my garden.

Tiger Kitten only produced two buds.  This was a one fan root last summer. It’s making progress.  Can’t wait for next year!

 

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Tiger Kitten – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

Stella, of course, was here with me all weekend, in both yellow and gold.

 

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Yella Stella – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

 

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Orange Stella – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

And, Orange Flurry lit up my smaller zeriscape garden in the rocks.

 

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Orange Flurry – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

So, here is my Ned Roberts Southwest spider garden that I put in this spring.  The first two pictures are before.  It is of note on the second photo that the earth no longer comes up to the top of the bricks.  PS – I would have done a higher raised bed, but the yuccas won.

 

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Ned Roberts Southwest spider patch (before) – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

 

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Note the level of the soil and mulch within the bricks.

 

Here is the after picture.  Probably no different to most people.  The difference is that the earth is now back up to the top of the brick.  Because daylilies are funny about planting depth, this meant raising the grade of the garden by first loosening up each daylily, putting the growing medium underneath, and then surrounding each cultivator with the medium.  It reminds me of the tale of raising Galveston Island several feet after the 1900 Great Storm.  They did it one structure at a time, too. It took all afternoon yesterday.

 

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Southwest lily patch (after) – a lot of work for something that looks pretty much the same.  Just ask the daylilies, though, it has been a weekend of prep for a new season.

 

Today, I filled the gaps with the remaining medium because the daylilies were all in mounds after being raised.  Sounds easy enough, except I was mixing up a concoction of steer manure, compost, peat moss, water crystals, soil acidifier, and time release fertilizer.  Oh, and given that I tromp around pretty hard with my camera, I also added some little stepping stones so the soil could stay fluffy.   I think my motivation is not only the anticipation of the blooms (a type of savoring), but also the number of little gardens that I see on my dog walks that have gone untended.  I think how cool the initial intention was . . . . but it is long gone.   This Colorado Plateau is a different ecosystem than the South.

I read yesterday that with plenty of water, amendments, and the right amount of fertilizer you can get 2-3 x as many blooms.  Might as well give it a shot.  For tomorrow, we will talk about grass weeds vs daylily sprouts.  Maybe someone out there can help me with that issue!!!