Grief and the Lessons of Corona

Maybe a daylily blog is a weird place to talk about grief . . . but the daylilies are part of it. Friday the 13th of March was the day my life shifted. We put a traditional onground program online over the weekend. I had two enthusiastic brand new, full-time instructors to help me and I was super glad for years of online teaching experience.

Chaco Canyon 8.3, 20 (blooming since 6.25.20)

It was weird at first . . . we thought it would end in two weeks 😉 The days were long – 15 hours. I was exhausted – But I made progress without the distractions of the office. The students got a little crazy and that was hard . . . but we got through and got the nursing students graduated in late May.

Chorus Line 8.3.20

Once the warm weather came, I could eat lunch on my porch and enjoy my yard and daylilies. My pups got to be outside all day instead of cooped up in the house waiting for me to get home at 7 PM. We took evening walks and howled on the porch at 8 PM. I taught my disabled dog to use wheels and got my senior dog through two more treatments to finally clear her of infection. I got projects done around home – like painting murals and installing drip systems. Without the artificial need for an 8-6 with commute, my creativity came back. My energy got better.

El Desperado 8.3.20

Oh, there were the MA students who were in limbo with no clinical rotations who I had until the second week of July. But, I was surrounded by the other elements of my life throughout the journey. I guess I didn’t realize how much I missed them – how they fed my energy. Saturdays are not enough!

Heirloom Heaven 8.3.20

My camping trip came and went with only a few crisis – like one of my two full-time people resigning. Once I got home 3 weeks ago, I started feeling the grief. The daylilies would dwindle . . . and once school started, I would have no time for them. More than that, my life would dwindle back to a rut that is created by monotonous work in a small office with no windows and countless unforeseen issues to deal with, mostly alone. I am the only faculty with a doctorate in my institution – and 20 years teaching, 35 as a nurse – it is isolating to be so experientially separated from others. (The new college director is the second person with a doctorate.)

Navajo Grey Hills 8.3.20

Tomorrow is my last day at home until mid October. Until the leaves turn my pups will be in crates by day. My daylilies will wonder where the camera went. I will become enmeshed in the endless tasks of the day and be too tired to want to walk into the house of hungry dogs at 7 PM. My dogs will become a chore in an all too busy day, again.

Purple Thunderbird 8.3.20

What is wrong with me, I think to myself? I really wanted to get away from a stay at home job because of the isolation. And, there are good things about this job. But, I am more engaged with my pups than my career at the moment. It has been a time of a lot of change for my program the past two years . . . a lot of change. And, I am responsible for way more than I want to be at this point in my life.

Ruby Stella 8.3.20

An online job beckons, again – and/or retirement. Maybe at the end of this school year. I am writing this blog to remind myself of this moment . . . of all the horrible and tragic things Corona Virus has brought to the world, it has brought me insight into my grief. I could step out of my rut and now I am having a hard time finding a purpose in returning.

Shape Shifter 8.3.20

I hope I have a new direction or at least attitude by the times the greens of the next crop of daylilies is born through the earth. Please enjoy my bloomers on my next to last day of freedom.

Skinwalker 8.3.20

I will not forget the lessons of Corona. Perhaps the strangest part of all is that no one seems to see the struggle inside of me . . . . that makes the isolation 10 X worse. Thanks for letting me share with you.

Dog Day Afternoon

Warm afternoons working from home. I use portable AC, so it gets warm enough to make me sleepy. It was hard to focus on the last of the training I was doing because I wanted to doze. A dog day afternoon. More on that in a minute.

Golden Eclipse 7.27.20

I had two premiers today. The first one I will talk about is Golden Eclipse, a Ned Roberts cultivator. When I ordered her, the seller (Doris) told me I might not like the color – it was a muddy brown. Heck, you know me, I like the name, I buy the daylily. And, actually, I think she is a pretty rusty-red color with the gold outline. Maybe our soil or conditions bring out a better color in my yard.

Chorus Line 7.27.20

The second premier is an older daylily – Chorus Line. She has been here several years and is a dependable bloomer. One of my favorite pale pastels.

Sazi with both hind legs in the air.

OK, back to dogs. I am working long hours, again. Still from home for another week, I had enough of my computer about 3:30 and went out to sit on the patio with my dogs for a break. My little dog, Sazi, was sitting with both hind legs stuck flexed up towards her body. She was barking and distressed, but not crying in pain. She would scoot on her butt to move anywhere. So, sit. on the floor and raise your legs as high as you can off the ground toward your face. Scoot around or whatever – but hold that for an hour.

Pup, Sazi, after a trip to the urgent care vet.

My pup has inter-vertebral disc disease and has had episodes for about 2.5 years. I rescued her to hike with my other dog because my senior was getting old. Then, her little body started to have problems. She is partially paralyzed but dogs can still walk with no feeling in their legs. Now, it is another 8 weeks of meds and absolute crate rest. And, school starting next week. Ugh, some dog day afternoon. I hope I have time to stay engaged with the daylilies until the end. So often, there are too many distractions.