Duos, Trios, and Quartets

The peak is easing, somewhat rapidly. I only had 40+ today, yesterday was 50+, and the day before 60+. And, so the tide recedes for another season. Not that it is over . . . anything but. However, I can keep up with this pace and it will continue to decline while I am away for a few days. I will only miss 4 days of photos.

I can slow my pace just a bit and savor the duos, trios and quartets of blooms. Daylilies don’t clump with a zillion blooms at once much in the desert. So, it is fun to focus on seeing the small gatherings.

One premier today!

Royal Braid was a bonus that came with Oh, Erica last year. I like it, and always appreciate a later bloomer in the patio area to keep it alive for longer.

Finales:

Pink Enchilada final 7.18
Thin Man finale 7.18.1
Indian Giver finale 7.18
Cheyenne Eyes 7.18 finale
Cheddar Cheese finale 7.18

What are we waiting for – Zuni Thunderbird, Purple Thunderbird, Desert Icicle, Adios Albuquerque, Glen Eyrie, Cripple Creek, Navajo Curls, Skinwalker, Purple Corn Dancer, Royal Palace Prince, Heirloom Heaven, Dr Doom and Pizza Crust all have scapes now but have not bloomed. I could get some other later scapes, too. That is still a lot to look forward to when I return from New Mexico (or tomorrow).

Duo of Nearly Wild today
A Trio of Mini Pearls
And, Stephanie Returns plays in quartet today.

So far, I have had 140 +/- cultivators bloom and it looks like at least 13 more – so mid-150s/180 puts us at mid 80s bloom rate. Much better than last year. I am looking at moving some new, more reliable bloomers in to replace those that bloom only occasionally and aren’t favorites. I love the smell of new daylily roots! Eventually, they will sing duos, trios, and quartets in my yard.

Savoring

Savoring is a concept that I learned about over a decade ago as a student of positive psychology.  Savoring is what I do in the garden every morning – I immerse myself in the color and shape of each bloom. It is a sense of awe, really.  And, fall seems to turn up the volume of appreciation for each bloom.  July feels almost rushed to get photos of each flower . . . but August slows it down enough to notice each individual bloom.

It is almost funny that today brought two new faces.  I only have three unbloomed (for 2017) cultivators left to bloom now.  Today brought an old favorite, Heirloom Heaven.  A sweet, petite late bloomer.

HeirloomHeaven4.8.7

And, it brought the first Passionate Returns (except the one that I missed Saturday).  This is a new plant just a couple weeks ago when I was craving some more late bloomers.  I love the color and the ruffles.

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Now, it is fall chores.  This year, that is a lot due to the decision to put almost everyone in pots of some sort.  I’m maybe 2/3 finished.  Then, I have several that need to be divided and given to friends/coworkers.  I have turned into a serious hobbiest, and the transition is a bit painful at times.   I am hopeful that next year will be easier.  More time to savor.

 

Savoring the Four Seasons with Daylilies

Savoring is the art of being in the moment and totally immersing ourselves into an experience.  It means no multi-tasking or thinking about chores.  It also includes planning for experiences, as well as reminiscing about the past good times.

So, today my yard takes on all of the above.  Here are my in the moment blooms:

Apache Uprising:

 

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Apache Unrising – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

Royal Palace Prince:

 

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Royal Palace Prince – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

Fairy Tale Pink:

 

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Fairy Tale Pink – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

Marque Moon:

 

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Marque Moon – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

Orange Flurry:

 

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Orange Flurry – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

Stella do Oro:

 

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Stella de Oro – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

In savoring the 2016 daylily season, I write this blog.  Last night, I actually looked through every post I made this summer.  It will be so cool to read back on things this winter, while I am painting these beauties.  I have tile paintings of Inwood, Cheddar Cheese and Route 66 in my room.  I said I didn’t want to ever have a day of the year where I didn’t wake up to daylily blooms.  And, so it is.  I cannot wait to add a few paintings of my new Ned Roberts Spiders.

And, that is a perfect segway into savoring through planning.  I have a few interventions for my Ned Roberts garden to start this month.  Things to empower more blooms next year.  Last night, I also found a Ned Roberts spider that is pretty rare on the auction, and put in a bid (it’s under $10).  I got my potted ones planted yesterday . . . the ones that were only temporarily in pots.  And, I fertilized.  It’s all part of beginning to savor next season.

The seasons of savoring daylilies:

Spring: Looking for the baby fans, cleaning out beds, watering on nice days, fertilize a little, early bloomers show-up!

Summer: Bloom fest! Photography and active blogging. Savor each colorful bloom.  Also, water, weeds, insects, and dead-heading.

Fall: Savor the late bloomers. Take time to smell each one.  Begin preparing beds for fall.  Fall planting.  Begin to consider which cultivators will make the best paintings.

Winter: Break out the paints!  Be creative – what new ways can daylilies be painted objects that I see every day during the cold, bleak months?  Paint daylilies on pumpkins.  Hey, what about daylily ornaments?  (I just thought of that one and need to consider how I might accomplish that before Christmas.) I love the daylily solar lights in my garden.  More for this winter, too.  Oh, the list goes on.  And, hey, what about searching for a few rare daylilies to add to my garden in the spring?  Look, winter is the busiest season of savoring of all!