Fooled Me

Oh, daylilies. I was so clueless when I began collecting these circa 7-8 years ago that I did dumb stuff with them. I stuck them in shade with no water. I stuck them in the hard, clay soil. I put them in pots with no water source except when I remembered the watering can. It never rains here.

The mystery daylily that I almost killed but revived from seedling size. No idea on name so this year she is Nosferatwo because she reminds me a little of Nosferatu 7.3.20

A few years ago, it hit me that all I was doing was buying daylilies, watching them bloom for one cycle followed by watching them wither away. So, I put in irrigation and cut down trees. I broke a rib burying pots so the soil was more controlled. I put in more irrigation . . . and more, and more.

Stephanie Returns brightens the yard on her second day in bloom 7.3.20

I actually think I will have a decent bloom rate this year – and I think it is all in the water. Well, not all – but it is the desert.

Fooled Me

So, when I first xeroscaped portions of my front yard, I purchased 3 daylilies to be part of the design – Orange Vols, Lady Fingers and a cultivator named Fooled Me. The first couple of years, they all did fine. Then, Fooled Me started to fade. No bloom, shrinking (last bloom 2015). I know that spot gets dry. Two years ago, I put it in a buried put in the same place . . . it got bigger but no bloom. This year, with the added drip sprinkler, it bloomed – today, for the first time since 2015 -IT BLOOMED!!! I may know how to make daylilies fade, but I am also getting good at year-to-year resuscitation. NEVER GIVE UP!

Chokecherry Mountain 7.3.20

Other premiers today were Chokecherry Mountain – a Robert’s spider that reminds me a lot of Talon.

Route 66 7.3.20

And, my favorite early “Southwest name” daylily, Route 66. Roadtrip memories flood my mind when I see her. Love her classic colors.

Soco Gap in the gap between two big yuccas 7.3.20

Soco Gap – a big plant that was a bonus back when the Southwest garden was an experiment. I plunked the little fans in between two medium sized Yuccas thinking she was small. Well, she is a decent sized cultivator and the cactus have grown, too. No way I can dig her out and put her in a pot – but the Yuccas are likely pretty protective of her!

Purple de Oro 7.3.20

Little Purple de Oro also had a premier bloom. IDK how I ended up with her and she is likely one of my least favorites. I keep waiting to fall in love.

Early Bird Cardinal with her flag colored background 7.3.20

Tomorrow is the 4th and I hope for a big show in the yard because they will be my fireworks during the coronavirus year.

There Ain’t No Cure for the Summertime Blooms

Sometimes, I feel a little sad that daylilies are the dominant plant in my yard. And, that camping season is superimposed on daylily season. To top that off, I have so many other plants that bloom in summer.

Mesa Peach Blanket Flower added to my Native garden yesterday.

I feel like those plants get ignored. I nurture the plants all winter, many as houseplants. And, boom, I barely notice their gorgeous blooms because 50 daylilies are competing for my time.

My oldest bloomer this day is my yucca. Her yucca patch was here when I first bought the house 20+ years ago.

Today, I walked my yard and took pictures of a dozen or so plants that are brightly blooming right now.

My coneflower is a couple years old, tall and proud member of my native garden.

It’s a weird bunch, from Thanksgiving cactus to white iris. From native to tropical.

This pink yarrow is also a new addition to my desert native garden.

I have more than are pictured here because I ended up with lots of pansies and petunias in color bowls.

My dancing lady orchid adds a splash of yellow to the back porch.

The oldest plant in bloom today is likely my Thanksgiving cactus or the bromeliad. All about 5 years with me. The youngest I planted yesterday.

And, my red bromeliad likes the sun but not the dry heat.

I wish there were more blues to contrast the daylilies – pansies and petunias help.

Thanksgiving cactus enjoying the temp drops at night.
Another white bloom is my iris, about done for another year.
Ice plants add color to the landscape this time of year.
This stunning yellow begonia adds color to the yard in summer.
One of the many bright annuals in my color pot.

I think daylily season starts tomorrow or Friday in my yard. Saratoga Springtime is about to burst. I have 30 scapes up, but none close to blooming. It seems a little late, but not much. I hope my bloom rate is good with the drought. It tends to be worse on drought years.

Saratoga Springtime bud about to burst.

Anyway, if I don’t get too burned out blogging, maybe I’ll do an extra post every so often about the other bloomers.

Kokopelli has Landed!

Kokopelli has made history as the first daylily bloom of 2018!  In Native American folklore, the Kokopelli turns winter to summer (and visa versa).  Today, Kokopelli brought thunderstorms . . . badly needed thunderstorms to our exceptional drought area.  Chilly, overcast.  When I first went out this AM, it was hot and dry, now it is cool and 60s.  I hope she brings more rain.

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Kokopelli was my first Ned Roberts daylily.  Now, my Southwest garden bulges with them. I have around 66 Roberts cultivators – most with southwestern names in my Southwestern Garden.  I have just over 75 cultivators in the Southwest Garden.  What bonds the is names from the Southwest US.  They live with some big yucca out in that garden, and a Kokopelli sculpture.

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Last year, I had about 15 different cultivators bloom in the Southwest Garden.  Not such a great rate out of 75.  That meant I needed to make changes.  My soil here is heavy clay with roots embedded.  We don’t get much rain, even on a good year.  So, that is when I started looking around and noticing that my potted cultivators did better.  Therefore, I dug up around 60 of the daylilies in the Southwest Garden, put them in better soil in a quick draining container, and buried the container.  Broke a rib and got sciatica in the process.

But, it seems to be paying off because I now have 20 cultivators in scape out there!  It is early in the season so I only have 8 scapes in all my other gardens combined.  Last fall, I had the elm tree that cast shade on the Southwest Garden removed.  I also added a soak hose watering system.  20 in scape by 6/3. . . I can’t believe my eyes.  It is the first time I ever had my first bloom from out there, too.

So, once the elm was a stump, I had to figure out what do with said stump.  I decided on a native garden.  It is raised on one side and slopes down so that the yucca that have been under the tree for years could be part of the new garden.  It has sage, Morman tea, ornamental grass, cactus, and several zeroscape flowers.  Today, I want to share photos of the current bloomers – neighbors to the Southwest Garden.  The new garden is the Hovenweep Garden.

 

 

PS – Next up is Orange Flurry – maybe tomorrow.  Who knows what a cool, rainy day might bring?

 

The Fruit Doesn’t Fall that Far from the Daylily

Today, I got the coolest bouquet from Mother Nature.  And, while I am a little sorry to be cutting so many finished scapes, I welcome some great fall bloomers.  Today, a favorite that joined my yard last year – El Desperado.

I bought this one last year because it still had unbloomed scapes when I walked through the nursery one Sunday.  I wasn’t sure where to put it, so I potted it and put it in the center of the yucca garden.  That was the beginning of my idea to make a southwestern garden out of that space.  I love the yucca, but the space needed more color, more inspiration.  And, from there I got into Ned Robert’s blooms.

 

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El Desperado – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

I obviously love daylilies.  But, I don’t know if I could ever be a hybridizer.  I do, however, sometimes looking at the genetic similarities of the blooms. And, El Desperado is the parent to another bloom that showed up today, Autumn Jewels.

 

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Autumn Jewels – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

It doesn’t take much imagination to see the genetics at work.  So, for fun, I looked up the other parent,  Calico Jack, and found this picture.  What do you think, does baby look like its parents?

 

Calico Jack – Google Image

 

The other eye-catching blooms in my yard today where Primal Scream (amidst the Potentilla).

 

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Primal Scream – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

And, Zuni Thunderbird.  Break out the paint brush.  The buds are getting used up . . . one left?

 

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Zuni Thunderbird – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

 

So, here is the collage.  I’m at 13 today.  Without the additions of last fall and this spring, I believe I would be at two.  I can live with that.  Viva La Daylilies!

 

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L to R: Top Row – Marque Moon, Soco Gap, Isaac.  Second Row – Prelude to Love, El Desperado, Primal Scream, Autumn Jewels, Zuni Thunderbird.  Bottom Row – Skinwalker, Mini Pearl, Orange Vols, Melon Balls, Lime Frost.

 

Red, White, and Blue

Today is Independence Day, and my dad’s birthday.  He is gone now, but the day is always a memory of him.  It is also the first day of my last term at school.  In 11 weeks, I am a doctor!  I hope my daylily blooms have peaked by then.

I am so glad I have Ruby Spider in the front garden now, with separating my original plant last year.  Why?  Because it is peak bluebell and daisy season.  Makes for a great red, white and blue photo.

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Ruby Spider with daisies and blue bells – photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

Other than a hint of patriotic hues in the garden, it was another slow day.  At first I thought I had no blooms in my Ned Roberts southwestern spider garden.  It wasn’t until we got home from the downtown events that I noticed Winds of Love.  It was pretty burned out by the time I got the photo.

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Winds of Love – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

What is cool, though, is that to the yucca in that garden are in love with more water . . . and one I have never seen blooming is doing so now.  It was a much smaller yucca garden for several years.  One put in to hide the blemish of a tree removed to replace the sewer line.  It got it got ignored more than not.  But the yucca grew, so I figure there would be enough sun for daylilies.  I can’t wait until the space has matured a bit, because I think the yuccas and daylilies will look fabulous together.

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Yucca Bloom – Photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

All of that said, I would give the prize for best flower to The Colorado Kid.  Once again, fabulous vibrant color.

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The Colorado Kid – photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

Wild Horses came to march in the parade of color today.  Always a favorite.

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Wild Horses – photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

And, Early Bird Cardinal tried to look patriotic, as well.

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Early Bird Cardinal – photo by Colorado Kid Daylilies – C. Hartt

And, hey, one of my favorite daylily companions, Flamingo Grass, is blooming.  Come on daylilies, lets roll!

FlamingoGrass2.7.4

So, that is it for the Fourth of July.  I think we may see Canyon Colors tomorrow.  Slo-mo daylily season.

 

Sweet Dreams!

I am one of those daylily addicts who tore up part of my old rock garden to put in a themed daylily garden.  Most of the residents are Ned Roberts daylilies with southwestern names.  But, thanks to the daylily farmers who send bonuses (many with the southwestern theme, too), I have a few others in that area.

Anytime you rip up rocks and plant something there (after 50+ years), it is a bit of an experiment.  The sun exposure is best there, that is why I picked that spot.  The tree that used to be there was taken down for a new sewer system a decade ago.  I made a little garden with yucca and a lilac, and so that is the history.  Last year, I put three Roberts daylilies out in that small area.  They came back (fall planting) looking great.  Now there is a whole list of Roberts blooms “to be” out there.  And I hold my breath that a few inches of good soil, water crystals, a permanent sprinkler, and mulch will make that habitable.

Today, it happened – the first bloom.  Dream Keeper.  I got up early to take photos and went back to bed (as I was up til after 2 AM doing homework).   I love these spiders, so delicate.  I love how the peddles twist and turn.  And, hey, this one looks like its photo.  Here is Dream Keeper from my yard. I purchased this one from Blueridge Daylilies.  They send healthy big plants!

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And, here is the one from the web. Mine actually looks a little more vibrant!

Dream Keeper

So, I take a deep breath that my new babies are happy out there.  I don’t think I’ll have another bloom for a few days.  But, in someways it is nice because I can savor each one.

For anyone looking for Ned Roberts southwestern cultivators, here is a list of growers who I purchased from the last couple of years (in no particular order):