Meanwhile, back at the daylily farm . . .

I can’t believe it has been almost 10 days since my last post. That doesn’t mean that daylilies aren’t blooming – although I think peak bloom is going to be a week or so later than usual. Maybe the drought . . . maybe some late cool days in the spring?

All I can say is life is in transition, so blogging had taken a back burner while I continue my job (part-time), clean and organize my house (also put on the back burner too long), and start a business. It is 11 PM (or later) when I finally have time to blog, but my heart and soul need rest.

So, since my last blog on 6.12, there have been a lot of premier blooms! (Premier meaning first bloom of the season) and I have 120 in bloom or with scapes. Here we go:

Rich-colored Canyon Colors made her debut on 6/15. She didn’t bloom last year so I had to dig her roots out of grass that had taken over her pot. She is recovering, but I don’t anticipate more than one scape this year.
Comanche Princess had a premier bloom on 6.18. She looks vigorous in both locations this year.
Echo Canyon made her debut today with three blooms. Our lead photo is her other two blooms.
Funny Valentine had her first blooms open when I returned from camping on Sunday. She has a ton of buds and scapes this year.
Mesa Verde showed up on 6.15. I love her colors, too. Makes me want to take a roadtip . . . actually, I will be at Mesa Verde next month.
Orchid Moonrise had her premier-premier bloom on 6.17. That means, despite having her in my garden for 4ish years, this is the first bloom year. She likes being in the pot away from the tree roots, I think.
Platinum Pink Pallet Whispers premiered today. Who names these daylilies, anyway?
Purple Grasshopper premiered on 6.11 but I can’t remember if I included her in my last blog.
Ruby Spider – One of my first and favorite daylilies. Premier was 6.21.
Wild Horses bloomed for the first time this season on 6.15. Always a stunning bloom.
Yellow Punch, my Lowe’s special a few years ago, opened on 6.15.
My first yellow Stella de Oro opened on 6.18. She is a very different color than my golden Stella and rates her own listing.

That’s about 12 premiers since the last blog. 100++ more to go. What’s next? I guess we will see tomorrow. I would like to get back to blogging regularly, at least on Sunday. I feel like daylily season will come and go so quickly this year. The plants (mostly) appreciate all the work I did potting them and/or refurbishing the soil. A few are too crowded now and seem hesitant to send out a scape. Fortunately, I can divide and sell them this fall.

Speaking of which – please drop by my Art and Nature from the Hartt website to see what I plan to carry in my Etsy store. I have lots of begonias and coleus cooking now . . . and some succulents. I can’t wait to start making daylily art, again, too. I will clean my house first, though. Come visit us at this link – http://www.artandnaturefromthehartt.com

TTFN!

The calm before the Daylily Storm

Not much new today. 65 or 70 daylilies with scapes. No new premiers today. Some days, this is my favorite part of the season because everything is still a mystery and my other flowers don’t get lost in the crowd.

The heat is hot (we will reach 00 this week and are in exceptional drought. I still have daylily water, but the insects are bad.

I think the “but it’s a dry heat” doesn’t apply to daylilies.

True Colors Shining Through

Too much going on in life to focus on anything too long. I get the watering done daily, though. Blogging comes second, but I made time today because . . . (drum roll) – I have my first Ned Roberts Spiders in bloom today. The yellow trumpets have company – true colors shining through! Dream Keeper is a reliable early bloomer. I am a little surprised that Purple Grasshopper is one of the first in the Southwest Garden. It didn’t bloom at all last summer but seems to have profited from being put in a put with new soil and no tree roots.

BTW – My plants are noticeably bigger this year after they were moved last year. I am hoping that results in more blooms this year. Here are the blooms of the day:

Premiers for Today

Dream Keeper 6.11.21
Purple Grasshopper 6.11.21

Former Premiers (this year):

Saratoga Springtime – Premier Bloom 6.3.11 (this photo was taken 2 days ago)
Happy Returns premier bloom 6.6.21
Stella de Oro – Premier bloom 6.7.21

Follow our NEW! Art and Nature from the Hartt blog page, where I will be selling plants and nature/Southwest artwork. There will be daylilies and daylily art for sale!

http://www.artandnaturefromthehartt.com

The First Week

The daylily blooms started last week on the 4th. IDK why I haven’t posted. Lots going on. Semi retiring, starting a plant and art business, still busy at my day job (now part time).

Saratoga Springtime started it all, as usual. She is pretty flashy for a yellow Trumpet. And, big.

Stella de Oro and Happy Returns also made appearances this week. They are look-alikes. Happy is a little more fragile.

My new business is Art and Nature from the Hartt. I’m planning to sell some daylily plants this fall. I’ll also have daylily art for sale. I’ll post a link to my site below. Please consider following us for updates.

Bromeliads: Lions, Tigers and Pups

It’s crazy that 6 months have past since my last blog. I’ve been inside with my houseplants all winter and now the daylilies are starting to push up from the ground. Although, it is a snow weekend, so I decided to do a little blog on my bromeliads.

I got into bromeliads a couple years ago after reading that they were good companion plants for aloe, snake plant and yucca because of similar shape.

Vriesea Hieroglyphica

The habitats are different, but they tolerate being potted neighbors pretty well. Broms are tough for tropical plants.

I live in the high desert of Colorado. The yuccas and aloe are close kin to our Native plants. The broms do OK outside in the summer shade if you add some humidity boosters. Sunburn can be an issue in our climate.

Bromeliads remind me of my Grandma Hartt. She had several. She got them from a plant store in Denver. The first ones I got were a tribute to her collection.

The problem with daylilies is that you learn about mail order plants. That’s cool, but makes for endless choices in shapes, sizes and colors. I’ve gotten several beautiful ones locally, but the online ones bring so much more variety to my collection.

I also love the unique patterns. This is what really makes my collection unique from my other plants. Lions, tigers . . . Very unique markings. I grow them for foliage more than the incredible blooms. BTW, they don’t die after blooming. These bitches give birth to pups. Hoping to sell the offspring on my Esty site in a few years.

Guzmania – commonly found in grocery stores

My colors now are more muted than summer. My broms will be happy for more sun, although the bugs move in. Bromeliads are pretty resilient even though spiders seem to enjoy hiding in them.

I love plants with colorful foliage. I need to update you on my begonia winter project at some point. I’m a creative. I think I just like color. My winter houseplant color raises my wellbeing in the cold, dark months.

Neoreglia High Voltage

Please enjoy my small collection of (now) high desert bromeliads. I should plan a follow up when they are in full color in the fall after the summer sunshine.

Jazzed!

Wow! I haven’t blogged since school started nearly 2 weeks ago? I’m not really surprised. It’s overwhelming to be short of faculty and it never seems to stop. On top of that, there was my daylily repotting project 2 weekends ago (20 of 70 done) and camping last weekend. Twenty more this weekend.

Purple Corn Dancer 8.19.20

I have four buds left – all Purple Corn Dancer. It is really winding down. With the drought – I hold little hope of rebloom, even from the yellow trumpets. So, why and I jazzed? Because there is LOTS of new growth in several of the daylilies I repotted two weeks ago.

Purple Thunderbird 8.19.20

The season shifts. Now, my daylilies are plants to be nurtured. This is a great time to put out a little growth because first freeze is still 5 weeks or so away and the days will be warm enough until mid to late October for the cultivators to grow into the next season. Then, will come the snow . . and mulching . . . and freezing temps. I won’t pay much attention to the daylilies – maybe genealogy and movies to pass the dreary hours of being reliant on my furnace for comfort. A few pots will move to the back porch for the winter- my barometer on spring is watching the porch lilies. Then, finally, the porch lilies have enough growth to move outside in late February and little by little the green appears. Then, it is time to sit on the porch, again – and hope for scapes to show soon. After that, three months of bloom season and heat. And, after that, the cycle begins anew. Let’s hope for a little rain and moisture in all of that.

Navajo Curls 8.20.20

Blooms for the First Day of School

I’m exhausted. The day started OK, other than early. I spied a bloom on my air plant and decided it was a good omen. I thought positive thoughts to try to prepare myself for a full day of orientation followed by welcoming students to a different program in the evening.

Air plant bloom 8.17.20

All’s well until I go to let my pups out and discover my poor senior was having major GI issues. I mopped her up and headed to work. I had 25 minutes to prep for orientation and my computer crashed. OK, keep thinking positive.

Purple Corn Dancer 8.17.20

We hired a new faculty. That was good . . . Until she quit 3 hours later. Then, I return home to find my senior pup in worse shape than this AM. I wonder if it’s something she ate or if it’s getting close to her end time.

Carlotta 8.17.20

She got a bath, I made the world fresh again. And had dinner. It’s 9:20 and I’m sitting down for the first time all day. No wonder my thyroid won’t stabilize. I’m grateful for three nice blooms today . . . Plus the air plant.

Royal Palace Prince 8.17.20

Butterflies

Today brought more buried garden work. It was in the 90’s and I did have to dig in the mucky, clay-silt earth a bit. My thyroid isn’t tolerating the heat so well . . . I was drenched.

The next batch of pots won’t be here until the 3rd. I should only need 1 more batch after that. It seems slow, the delivery. It’s weird that Target is the only one even close to the prices I paid in 2017. Most are 3-5 $ more. I use to buy 10 at a time at bulk discount but that’s a pipe dream now. I was going to do this in 2018 . . . No point regretting it now.

Purple Corn Dancer the sole bloom on 8.16.20

IDK about you, but I get excited in early spring when the daylilies leaves seem to grow right before your eyes. I get butterflies when I see the first scape. Then, the blooms come. I wish I felt a bit more of that excitement about school starting tomorrow. I just feel tired already. That’s kind of sad.

From Desert to Daylilies

Today was a desert drought day. Smoke from nearby wildfires clouded the air. Ninty degrees with single digit humidity. The desert – my cacti and succulents are loving it.

Purple Corn Dancer 8.15.20

Today, I began the repotting project in the Southwest Garden. It wasn’t too bad – I got 15 done and have 5 more pots for tomorrow. I have lots more pots to order, but even $6 pots add up when you have several dozen daylilies.

Purple Thunderbird 8.15.20

I was thankful these were in cheep pots already because my soil is murder to dig in. There is an area in the garden that needs to have the holes dug but I aint doing that in 90 degree heat. Speaking of soil – the cheep pots did well at holding the new soil in but they all had tree roots growing into them. Our soil is mostly clay and silt (90+%) and has a very alkaline pH of 7-7.8. Daylilies like slightly acidic soil that has a pH of 6-6.5. They like slightly moist soil with some organic matter. Our clay soil is hard and dry with poor water retention. I have put several inches of topsoil in that garden circa 4 years ago and you would never know it – the clay wins.

Navajo Curls 8.15.20

At any rate – I have 3 bloomers left in that garden – Purple Corn Dancer (will be hanging around the longest), Purple Thunderbird, and Navajo curls. I am working around them so I don’t accidentally break a scape. It is amazing how the foliage looks so dry and the plants are shrinking back. I am not watering everyday due to work. Ugh – Monday is a 12 hour day. I miss working from home where I can run out and turn hoses on. The drought doesn’t care.

Purple Corn Dancer 8.15.20

I had a dream about my daylilies last night. I sold my house and after I closed I realized I left the daylilies. The new owner said I could go back and get them. But, I was like on a country road looking everywhere for them. I will be glad when they are potted because they are on the easement. I think having the sewer guys almost having to dig up my neighbor’s easement to get to my sewer woke me up. The pots can be moved.

Dwindle

Oh, how the mornings have changed from a month ago. I was fresh off vacation and in the midst of the daylily peak. Now, my mornings bring a handful of color and an early drive to work. And, work is no vaca in the middle east a pandemic.

Royal Palace Prince 8.14.20

It’s hot, though. And, really dry with single digit humidity. Wind fires blaze. Record breaking temps are common. Too hot and dry for reblooming. Even yellow Punch isn’t trying for a comeback.

Purple Corn Dancer 8.14.20

I got the first of the pots for you buried garden. Soil tomorrow. It’s kind of hot so I’ll start with just moving those already in pots to the better pots. I can’t dig tree into clay in this heat with a Graves flair.

Navajo Curls 8.14.20

Anyway, enjoy my dwindling handful of color.

Purple Thunderbird 8.14.20