July Daylily Round-up N-Z

Here is part 1 of this blog post These posts include all daylilies that were in bloom in July in my yard. Please see first post for more details.

Navajo Grey Hills 7.16-present
Nearly Wild 7.11-7.31
Nona’s Garnet Spider 7.5-7.18
Nosferatu 7.12-7.19 (end 7.19-7.24 during vaca)
Nurse’s Stethoscope 6.24-7.16
Oh Erica 7.17 (end 7.19-7.24 during vaca)
Ojo de Dios 6.28-7.15
Orange Flurry 7.10-7.26
Orange Vols 7.27-present
Orchid Moonrise 6.17-7.8
Papa Longlegs 7.2-7.17
Pardon Me 6.30-7.18
Passionate Returns 6.28-7.29
Petite Petticoats 6.26-7.10
Pink and Cream 6.24-7.11
Pink Enchalada 7.4-7.18
Pink Rain Dance 7.4-7.25
Pizza Crust (started week of 7.19)-present
Platinum Pink Pallet Whispers 6.21-7.2
Prairie Blue Eyes 7.1-7.27
Prelude to Love 7.3-8.1
Primal Scream 6.25-7.15
Pueblo Dreamer 7.5-7.19
Purple Corn Dancer 7.27-present
Purple de Oro 7.11-7.16
Purple Many Faces 7.17-7.27
Purple Thunderbird 7.26-present
Purple Grasshopper 6.11-present. Non-stop!
Purple Moonrise 6.15-7.5
“Purple Mystic” NOID 6.24-7.16
Quilt Patch 7.9-7.19
Raven Woodsong 7.8-present
Red Hot Returns 7.11-7.19 (ended 7.19-7.25 during vaca)
Red Riddle (NOID) 6.23-7.9
Return a Smile 6.25-7.14
Rocky Mountain Pals 7.9-7.28
Rosie’s Red 7.9-present
Route 66 7.1-7.19
Royal Braid 7.18 (ended 7.19-7.25 during vaca)
Royal Palace Prince 7.25-present
Ruby Spider 6.22-7.19 (ended 7.19-7.24 during vaca)
Ruby Stella 7.5-present
Santa Fe Christmas (right) 7.2-7.26
Santa’s Pants 6.26-7.9
Skinwalker 6.19 to present
Soco Gap 7.3-7.19
South Seas 6.30-7.25
Spirit of the Morning 7.12-8.1 (unless I missed a bud)
Stella 6.7-7.1
Stephanie Returns 6.30-7.28
Strutters Ball 7.5-7.27
Taco Twister 7.12-present
Talon 7.5-7.18
The Colorado Kid 6.23-7.18
Thin Man 7.3-7.18
Treasure of the Southwest 7.15-present
Truchas Sunrise 7.10-7.19

No U, No V – I need to fix that with some new flowers 🙂

Wild Horses 6.15-7.3
Wild Rose Fandango 7.1-7.19
Winds of Love 7.13-7.27
Wineberry Candy 7.4-7.13

No X, either!

Yellow Punch 6.15-7.4 (first encore 7.31)
Zuni Eye 7.15-present
Zuni Thunderbird 7.19-present

That is all for July, folks. Look for our Colorado Day (8/1) blooms up next!

The First Three Days

Finally caught-up taking photos off my camera. Never let that go for a week or two this time of year – you play heck catching-up. So, I thought I would get the blog fully up-to date by sharing our July 1-3 premier blooms for this year. Enjoy. Hopefully, tomorrow I start get back in daily sync. The good news is I got my art cove all cleaned, decluttered and added some fun stuff. That means the daylily paintings are coming – for sale through my business Art and Nature From the Hartt http://artandnaturefromthehartt.com

Bella Boo premier 7.2
Black Eyed Susan premier 7.2
Black Ice premier 7.2
Candy Cane Dreams premier 7.1
Cheddar Cheese premier 7.3
Coral Taco premier 7.2
Cricket Call premier 7.3
Fol de Rol premier 7.3
Jungle Queen premier 7.1
Lacey Doily premier 7.3
Papa Long Legs premier 7.2
Prairie Blue Eyes premier 7.1
Prelude to Love premier 7.3
Route 66 premier 7.1
Santa Fe Christmas premier 7.2
Soco Gap premier 7.2
Thin Man premier 7.3
Wild Rose Fandango premier 7.1

That’s 18 more in 3 days (wholly cow)! That brings our total to 70 that have bloomed so far. Happy 4th – hope to post the morning daylilies tomorrow.

July’s Colorful Parade

Are you ready for a beautiful July parade? Here goes – a listing of all of my daylilies that had first blooms in July. I count 81. Enjoy!

Apache Bandana 7.6.20
Autumn Jewels 7.22.20
Aztec Firebird 7.22.20
Baja 7.18.20
Bela Lugosi 7.22.20
Bella Boo 7.6.20
Black Arrowhead 7.19.20
Black Eyed Susan 7.2.20
Black Ice 7.22.20
Bold Tiger 7.26.20
Carlotta 7,30.20
Cheddar Cheese 7.4.20
Cherokee Star 7.6.20
Chokecherry Mountain 7.20.20
Chorus Line 7.29.20
Classy Lady 7.29.20
Coyote Laughs 7.17.20
Cripple Creek 7.29.20
Dancing Maiden 7.20.20
Desert Icicle 7.30.20
Dream Catcher 7.28.20
El Desperado 7.30.20
Fairy Tale Pink 7.22.20
Fine Time Lucille 7.19.20
Fooled Me 7.6.20
Frans Hals 7.22.20
Fringe Benefit 7.21.10
Glen Eyrie 7.29.30
Golden Eclipse 7.30.20
Happy Hopi 7.3.20
Heirloom Heaven 7.30.20
Heron’s Cove 7.3.1
Hesperus 7.29.30
Holy Sombrero 7.3.20
Hopi Jewel 7.17.1
Iktomi 7.30.20
Indian Giver 7.2.20
Indian Sky 7.28.20
Just Plum Happy 7.16.1
Kachina Firecracker 7.30.20
Kiva Dancer 7.4.20
Lacy Doily 7.7.1
Lime Frost 7.16.20
Lobo Lucy 7.21.20
Longlesson Showoff 7.20.20
Mama Cuna 7.22.20
Marque Moon 7.21.20
Maya Cha Cha 7.22.20
Navajo Grey Hills 7.30.20
Nona’s Garnet Spider 7.28.20
Nosferatu 7.27.20
Orange Flurry 7.26.20
Orange Vols 7.28.20
Painted Petroglyph 7.21.20
Papa Longlegs 7.16.20
Pardon Me 7.17.20
Passionate Returns 7.17.20
Prairie Wildfire 7.2.20
Prelude to Love 7.27.20
Purple de Oro 7.4.20
Raspberry Propeller 7.17.20
Raven Woodsong 7.18.20
Red Hot Returns 7.17.20
Red Mystery 7.17.20
Route 66 7.5.20
Royal Palace Prince 7.30.20
Ruby Stella 7.30.20
Shape Shifter 7.22.20
Skinwalker 7.29.20
Soco Gap 7.5.20
South Seas 7.17.20
Spirit of the Morning 7.27.20
Moon over Chimayo 7.20.20
Stephanie Returns 7.19.20
Taco Twister 7.21.20
Talon 7.27.20
Thin Man 7.4.20
Treasure of the Southwest 7.30.20
Twirling Pinata 7.29.20
Winds of Love 7.19.20
Zuni Thunderbird 7.22.20

A fairy tale, a classy lady and a skinwalker walk into a bar . . .

OK, maybe it is a bad time for a joke about bars. Or, not. I am, of course, really talking about my three premier blooms today.

Fairy Tale Pink 7.21.20

Fairy Tale Pink was one I picked up at a local nursery several years ago because I was bored with my existing blooms. The drip system has helped her – she got so dry in past years that her buds often dried up. She is in my sprinkler blind spot.

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Classy Lady . . . I think I got her on the Lily Auction with some other daylilies that I liked and wanted to get the most for my postage.

Skinwalker 7.21.20

And, oh Skinwalker! This Ned Roberts spider is the biggest, lankiest spider in the garden (well, the Southwest garden, anyway). I love the colors – and the tall scapes. It reminds me of a scarecrow.

Cheddar Cheese 7.20.20

That makes 122 cultivators so far (counting the 2 I missed on vaca). That’s 71%. And, we have a few more premiers in the future. Come on, 75%!

Red Hot Returns 7.20.20

Finales are Cheddar Cheese, Red Hot Returns, Prairie Blue Eyes and Route 66. See you all next year . . . at the bar.

Prairie Blue Eyes 7.20.20

It is time to start ordering the new pots for the Southwest buried garden soon. I will start by repotting the ones already in pots this fall. It is awful to dig into the clay soil and tree roots. I do not look forward to that part at all. But, it is the easement and I don’t want to risk loosing them to a busted water pipe.

Route 66 7.20.20

Adios, Albuquerque

This year, there was no spring break road trip – adios, Albuquerque.  Adios to the best week of the year.  Adios to the canyons of the Southwest.  The only novel adventure this year is named Corona – and I don’t mean the arch in Utah.

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Petroglyph National Monument HQ – 2014

Albuquerque is about 6-8 hours down US Hwy 550.  In fact, that highway starts in Montrose and ends in Albuquerque.

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Petroglyph National Monument near Albuquerque, NM – 2014

When I think of Albuquerque, I think of my 2014 road trip with my new dog, Maizzy, and my new Honda Fit, Mini Pearl.  I had plans for Chaco Canyon and for Route 66, and what lie in between was a mystery – my choice of which way to turn on the open road.  The first couple of years, I didn’t get reservations until the day I left the previous motel.  More dogs = more planning.

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Petroglyph National Monument – 2014

I don’t like cities, so I was zooming as quickly as I could from US Hwy 550 to I-40 (Route 66) when I noticed a sign for Petroglyph National Monument.  I was like – “Well, that sounds interesting”, so off I went.  There was a dog friendly section where we hiked until mid afternoon.

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Maizzy – my non-desert dog in the desert at Petroglyph National Monument

Road trips through the Southwest are geology on wheels.  I found these petroglyphs stunning because they were on volcanic rock and not red sandstone like I am use to.  This one looks like Charlie Brown with a baseball cap to me.

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Charlie Brown Petroglyph and Petroglyph National Monument

 

From there, we headed west on I-40.  I saw signs for El Malpias National Monument, so we stopped there for a short scenic drive.  It was like a combo of volcanic rock and red sandstone.  I realized they what I realize most everyday of every road trip – that I play too long and run out of time before I want to stop.

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El Malpias National Monument – 2014

The other cool place near Albuquerque is Salinas Mission Pueblos National Monument.  We didn’t run into these 2016.  That was another serendipity where we were on a stretch of highway with nothing to do between point A and point B – then there was this photo on the wall of ruins – and I had to find them.

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Maizzy at Salinas Mission Pueblo Ruins – 2016

Last year, our trip took us through that area, again – so I went with all three dogs.  I love the big old mission buildings as a background for my small dogs.

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Kachina, Sazi, and Maizzy at Salinas Mission Pueblo Ruins National Monument – 2019

These trips to me are Albuquerque – unique in culture and landscape.  Adios Albuquerque was added to my daylily garden in 2016, I think.  After these trips that are forever engraved in my memory.  I put it in my Southwest garden with (mostly) other Ned Roberts spiders.

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Adios Albuquerque daylily – 2019

The garden was put in where there was only rock garden – on the easement between the sidewalk and the street.  I have no back yard, because it is a split lot – so I actually have almost all of these daylilies in buried pots in case the water main ever busts there.

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Adios Albuquerque daylily – 2019

I like the bloom – it is subtle.  Albuquerque was Ned’s home until he moved to Colorado for treatment – at least that is my understanding.  He, no doubt, loved the New Mexico culture.  It is different from Colorado . . . it must have been hard for him to say Adios, Albuquerque.  Fortunately, I have his daylilies to take me on a road trip on the year of the pandemic.

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Adios Albuquerque daylily 2019

 

 

Daylilies for the Navajo Nation

Today, it struck me that no series of blogs about the Southwest during Coronavirus would be complete without a mention of the Navajo.  I love the Navajo culture – it makes my trips to the Southwest take on a cultural feel that is humbling.  I have so much to be grateful for in life.  And, I do envy their sense of family and community.

I was wondering if we could trace the boundaries of the Navajo Nation from various road trips.  So, last year, we traced the New Mexico side starting at the Shiprock and down through the Bisti Badlands.

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Shiprock Flea Market – 2019 road trip

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Bisti Badlands – 2019 road trip

If we were to have headed due east after the Bisti Badlands the way the crow flies, would would trace the Navajo Nation boundary to Window Rock (the capitol of the Navajo Nation) and Fort Defiance.  These are absolutely some of my favorite stops in Navajoland.  I like to spend the night in Window Rock so I can spend the whole day taking in the scenery.

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Window Rock, AZ – 2018 Road Trip

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Near Fort Defiance – 2018 Road Trip

Then we would turn due south – if we were tracing the boundary.  That would take us just south of Route 66.

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Route 66 Arizona – 2014 Road Trip

And, then we trace west to the Northern Border of the Painted Desert at Petrified Forest National Park.

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Painted Desert – 2018 Road Trip

From there, you head due west, almost to Flagstaff.  Then it is a turn to the North through Cameron up to Page – just east of the Grand Canyon.

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Eastern Grand Canyon – 2015 Road Trip

You end up almost to Utah, at Page, AZ.  That was a strange stop the year we went because they weren’t on rez time, even though everything surrounding the city was an hour later.  We visited the famous Horse Shoe Bend near Page.

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Horse Shoe Bend – 2015 Road Trip

Then, you are up in Utah at the Glen Canyon Dam area – a favorite stop on our road trips!

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Glen Canyon – 2015 Road Trip

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Mexican Hat – 2019 Summer Camping Road Trip

Then, it is pretty much due east to Mexican Hat, UT.  Very iconic Utah.

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Bluff Utah – 2019 Summer Camping Road Trip

And then a bit further to Bluff, UT – we camped here last summer.  It was a fun (but hot) spot to explore.

We approach home as we get to Hovenweep National Monument on the Colorado Border – this is absolutely a favorite spot and a place I plan to go camping as soon as we can travel more than 10 miles, again.

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Hovenweep National Monument – 2019 Summer Camping Road Trip

From there, the boundary heads South to Teec Nos Pos, AZ.  They have a great trading post there.

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Teec Nos Pos – Fall Break Four Corners Trip 2015

And, we are almost back to Shiprock, where we started.  I wish I could end the story here, but there are a few other favorite places that are internal to the Navajo Nation that we must visit.  First, the infamous Monument Valley.  This is just south of the Mexican Hat.

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Monument Valley – 2019 Summer Camping Road Trip

And, Navajo National Monument has great free camping and some very spiritual ruins.

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Navajo National Monument – 2016 Utah Graduation Camping Trip

The other route we frequent is 191 South – This is a good route to the Senora through the Four Corners area.  I absolutely love Canyon de Chelly – it has the best red rock of any canyon I have visited.

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Canyon de Chelly National Monument – 2017 Road Trip

With a stop at the Hubbell Trading Post on the way to Petrified Forest.

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Hubbell Trading Post – 2017 Road Trip

Sadly, Coronavirus has hit the Navajo Nation hard.  As of tonight (5/9) they have nearly 3,000 cases and nearly 100 deaths.  So, this blog is my tribute to this nation that is feeling the grip of COVID-19.

OK, back to the daylily blog.  Here are my Navajo named daylilies. (I have a few, I wonder why?)

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Navajo Blanket Daylily – 2019

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Navajo Curls Daylily – 2019

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Navajo Grey Hills Daylily – 2019

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Navajo Rodeo Daylily – 2019

With this, I live vicariously through my daylilies while I stay safe at home.  It is not the time to travel to Navajoland – but my heart goes there often.  Now, I think of the reservation.  I think of the poverty and the hardship that these people know.  They lived a less hurried life, they honor their ancestors.  I learn so much from my visits.  With this, I send heartfelt thoughts of hope and healing to this spiritual land.

PS – This was fun, although a bit time consuming – I never really thought about tracing the border of the Navajo Nation through my trip photos.

Getting My Kicks With Route 66

Route 66 is due South of Montrose, CO.  You can get to the New Mexico one by just driving south on Highway 550 until you hit Route 66 in Albuquerque.  Or, you can take Highway 491 and catch-up with it in Gallup.  You can also catch it in Arizona – we often drive by Monument Valley to Flagstaff and catch it there.  Of course, you can also catch it in Holbrook at the Petrified Forest.  We have done all of the above plus more. I have always said that it must have been a pretty amazing highway in its day – the road to the Southwest – the ruins and rock structures.

Maizzy, my crazy old chi-hound and I met up with it in Gallup on our first road trip (after a trip to Chaco Canyon and El Malpias). We rode it all the way to Petrified Forest.  Well, we took the sections that we could and were mostly on I-40, a place full of big, fast semi trucks.  We got to Holbrook, where we hung out on Route 66 for a bit. Then, back home through Monument Valley and Canyonlands.   That was 2014.

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Maizzy on Route 66 marker in Holbrook, AZ – 2014

Our road trip is South, so we almost always cross Route 66 – well, always because we have to cross it to get to the other side of the Southwest.  The next year, we traveled from down to Catalina State Park, AZ and back up to the Grand Canyon and Horseshoe Bend.  We went out for a night on the town at Route 66 in Flagstaff.

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Maizzy, Route 66, Flagstaff, AZ – 2015

The following year, 2016, we went down to Lost Dutchman State Park, AZ and on the way, we stopped at the Petrified Forest – where we walked in the Crystal Forest and crossed the old Route 66. We headed home through Socorro, NM and up through Farmington, NM.  Good grief, I can barely remember these amazing routes!

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Maizzy hiking in the Crystal Forest at Petrified Forest National Park, AZ – 2016

Where did 2017 take us? From the Four Corners to Flagstaff and down to Gila Bend and  Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument.  We came back and visited Casa Grande – then back up by Route 66 at the Petrified Forest.  By then, I had acquired dog #2, little once-feral, Kachina.

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On that bench on Route 66, Flagstaff, AZ, again – 2017

Soon enough it was 2018, and a new adventure came when spring warmed the earth.  This year, we left on Friday the 13th and took the Devil’s Highway (once numbered 666 because it was the 6th spur off Route 66) all the way to the AZ/Mexico border. We visited Canyon de Chelly and headed south to Chambers, AZ, which is smack-dab on Route 66. We drove to Clifton on the long, winding road and ended up in Tombstone.  We stopped at the Petrified Forest on the way home.  It was a horrific windstorm that day – but my dogs managed a photo at the Route 66 turnout.  Oh, and another dog joined the family – my little disabled chi rescue, Sazi Ana (think Anasazi).

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Windstorm at the Route 66 turnout at Petrified Forest National Park, AZ – 2018

And, my last road trip in 2019 was super awesome to start.  We went through Shiprock, NM and then down through the badlands to Grants, NM – which is on Route 66.  It is a long story that I forgot to get gas on the way to El Morro National Monument, so I was too tired to stop at any of the Route 66 attractions.  We headed south (I can’t stand I-40 in a Honda Fit with all those semis) after Grants and stopped at Salinas Pueblo Mission Ruins near Albuquerque – then to White Sands.  We did a long sprint to Tucson, Catalina State Park,  then back up to . . . um, drum roll . . . Petrified Forest.  You see, it’s dog friendly so we stop most years.  Except, last year I got Noravirus the day we were suppose to go.  We went – but I was too sick to do anything but pray for a motel bed ASAP.  We cruised (wanting to upchuck) I-40 (the new Route 66) and turned off to get to Window Rock.  The scenery in that part of the State is worth posting, except I was too ill to get pictures.

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El Malpias National Monument Near Grants, NM, off of Route 66 – 2019

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The motel in Window Rock, AZ, a few miles from Route 66 – 2019

Why am I talking about Route 66 on a daylily blog?  Because I am taking a road trip vicariously through my Southwest named daylilies while we wait for COVID-19 to settle down.  (Maybe Noravirus helped me to see how serous it is to catch a virus when you are traveling – all those restrooms, hotels, eateries, gas pumps – not safe yet).  Route 66 is a cultivator that I picked up years ago at the local greenhouse – long before I started collecting daylilies with Southwest names.  Long before I started taking road trips.

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Route 66 Daylily in bloom – 2019

However, now the blooms are more special.  I think of our trips to Gallup and Grants and Chambers and Holbrook and Flagstaff.  I think of the colors that are on the tee shirts – the red and black.  When I see the blooms, I think of my goofy dogs and all of our fun times, getting our kicks on Route 66.

Colorado Day: My Top 10 Red Daylilies

August 1st brought a cool day with rain.  School starts next week, work is buzzing.  But, I tell myself, we are still 6 weeks from fall and the short day, cool seasons. August 1st is also Colorado Day.  Colorado means red.  So, since I have no new cultivators today (but still 50+ in bloom), I thought I would share my top 10 red daylilies.  Here they are in no particular order:

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Ruby Spider – one of my oldest daylilies – 2019

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Baja – another oldy but goodie (looks like velvet) – 2019

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Route 66 – nice colors (she brings to mind my spring road trip) – 2019

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Maya Cha Cha – This is for my Granddaughter, Maia! – 2019

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Apache Bandana – an eye-catching flower – 2019

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Santa’s Pants – a jolly old soul – 2019

 

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Fox Ears – I simply love the shape! – 2019

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Nurse’s Stethoscope – I helped name this one (my legacy) – 2019

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Navajo Rodeo – I like the distinctive shape and the name – 2019

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Kachina Firecracker – looks like red ribbons – 2019

What’s your favorite?

Route 66

Route 66 is, of course, a famous highway that runs partially through the Southwest.  We usually pass over it going and coming from our spring road trip to the desert.  Route 66 is also the name of one of my favorite daylilies.  It was the first place name daylily that I got and after that, I was hooked.  My daylily names are like points on a road trip a lot of the time.

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Route 66, Flagstaff, Arizona

Today, I had 66 cultivators blooming in my yard.  I was thinking about Route 66 (she was in bloom and is the lead photo) and my own route to having 66 daylilies in bloom in one day.  In 2015, I had 7.  I now have 10X the number of daylilies.  How did I get here? . . . well, I started at local nurseries.  Then I tried one online site, then another.  Eventually, I got attached to my Ned Roberts spiders and found a couple growers with good supplies of those. (I now have around 70 of his cultivators.)  I also found the lily auction – which was fun but I get into trouble on that site.  LOL.

Some of the daylilies I got in 2015/16 are having their first bloom this year.  I think it takes them time to adapt to the desert – and last year, we had the exceptional drought.  The year before that, I transplanted them into buried pots – so that was another adjustment.  Anyway – it is cool to finally see some of these after tending them for a few years.

A couple of our Premiers today have been around that long and finally blooming.  One is Navajo Grey Hills and another is Fringe Benefit.  Navajo Grey Hills was a sought after Ned Roberts Southwest named daylily.  Fringe Benefit, on the other hand, was a bonus plant that looks nothing like the Fringe Benefit I see online.  But, oh well.  I honestly had no idea what it looked like until today.  I like both of them a lot!

So, without further ado, here are the Premiers (it’s not slowing down – So far, 133 blooms or about 74% bloom rate.  Last year this date we were at 123 – and I have a lot more scapes left this year.):

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“Fringe Benefit” bonus plant 7/23

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Navajo Grey Hills 7/23

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Fol da Rol 7/23

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Lime Frost 7/23

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Glen Eyrie 7/23

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Adios Albuquerque 7/23

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Bold Tiger 7/23

Counting Flowers on the Wall; That Don’t Bother Me At All!

So, I had a record number of cultivators in bloom the day before my trip, but no time to blog. Tomorrow, I’m home but too late to see any blooms. So, here is the 7/16 batch. Honestly, I don’t remember which were new bloom, but I’ll try. It’ll be good to see what’s new on Sunday!

Premiers:

Apache Beacon 7/16

Inwood 7/17

Wild Rose Fandango 7/16

Coral Taco 7/16

Little Cadet 7/16

Winds of Love 7/16

Lacey Doily 7/16

Royal Palace Prince 7/16

Black Eyed Susan 7/16

Anasazi 7/16

Reruns – lots and lots of reruns:

Purple de Oro 7/16

Mauna Loa 7/16

Longlesson Show-off 7/16

South Seas 7/16

Isaac 7/16

Stephanie Returns 7/16

Passionate Returns 7/16

Prairie Wildfire 7/16

Catherine Irene 7/16

Strutter’s Ball 7/16

Prairie Blue Eyes 7/16

Red Riddle 7/16

Indian Love Call 7/16

Purple Many Faces 7/16

Iktomi 7/16

Indian Love Call 7/16

Chief Four Fingers 7/16

Zuni Thunderbird 7/16

Rocky Mountain Friends 7/16

Soco Gap 7/16

Black Ice 7/16

Maya Cha Cha 7/16

Purple Mystery 7/16

Ruby Spider 7/16

Comanche Princess 7/16

Mildred Mitchell 7/16

Thin Man 7/16

Lady Fingers 7/16

Papa Long Legs 7/16

Purple Grasshopper 7/16

Chaco Canyon 7/16

Happy Hopi 7/16

Feather Woman 7/16

Ojo de Dios 7/16

Canyon Colors 7/16

Cheddar Cheese 7/16

Mesa Verde 7/16

Primal Scream 7/16

The Colorado Kid 7/16

Melon Balls 7/16

Pardon Me 7/16

Cricket Call 7/16

Wineberry Candy 7/16

Raspberry Propeller 7/16

Route 66 7/16

Golden Stella 7/16

Yellow Punch 7/16

Early Bird Cardinal 7/16

Pink and Cream 7/16

Mini Pearl 7/16

Orange Flurry 7/16

Golden Stella 7/16

Cheyenne Eyes 7/16

Pink Enchilada 7/16

Apache Bandana 7/16