The Heat is On

It’s just too hot to enjoy my harden after 11 AM. And my daylilys often look like melted wax by then, anyway. What happened to our cooling monsoons?

The flow of new daylilies begins to drop. It won’t be long until I’m counting non-blooming pots instead of blooms. I think I only have 4 left to bloom in front (unless I get a late scape). I have one on the porch and several in the Southwest Visions garden. It’s like late afternoon on Christmas Day when you realize that the day won’t last forever but there is still dessert to eat.

So, my premiers for yesterday and today included three Ned Roberts spiders and a beautiful bonus cultivator. I think I’m up to 48 Ned Spiders now. I think I have at least 10 more with scapes and there could still be surprise late scapes. So, 140 total cultivators have bloomed so far. 75% bloom rate. Hoping to get to mid 80s if more buds don’t dry up.

So, here we go.

Desert Icicle 7.19
Moon Over Chimayo 7.20
Iktomi 7.20
Carlotta 7.20

More Spiders in My Bed

Spider daylilies in my flower bed, that is.

I had 3 new Roberts spiders today. That makes 45 Cultivators from Ned Roberts so far.

Dream Keeper was one of my first 3 Roberts spiders when I started the Southwest Visions garden 6 years ago. Love the whispy shape and colors.

Dream Keeper 7.18

Mama Cuna reminds me of the painting I did last fall. She is planted right next to my huge banana yucca and looks like a weird bloom from the succulent. Mama Cuna is a signal that the season is moving on. She is mid-late.

Mama Cuna 7.18

Santa Fe Christmas was my favorite today for some reason. The colors are shape are unique and caught my eye. Not many buds this year, so savor every one of them.

Santa Fe Christmas 7.18
Tiger Kitten 7.18

Also, little Tiger Kitten (funny, I sell begonias with that name) opened one of its few buds for the first time today.

134 have bloomed so far. So, bloom rate in the 70s with lots left to go. Purple Corn Dancer is starting to put out scapes. She is always the last one.

Kokopelli and the Summer Solstice

Kokopelli is one of the most intriguing and widespread images surviving from ancient Anasazi Indian culture. He is depicted as a humpbacked flute player, and is widely believed to bring well-being to the people. He was the one who would change the seasons and bring about a good harvest. Allie Prater

Kokopelli 6.21

Kokopelli came today, bringing with him the change of seasons. Kokopelli, my Ned Roberts spider daylily that is. This cultivator is my gateway to my collection of Neds. Spied at the lily auction back when I was first considering a Southwestern Visions garden.

Apache Bandana 6.21

My other premier today is Apache Bandana. Another Ned Roberts spider.

I have 120+ in bloom or scapes. Two days left until retirement starts and 20% cell battery. See you tomorrow. My others are still blooming, BTW.

More Jaundiced Trumpets

Jaundiced trumpets always start the daylily show. Screaming yellow jaundiced trumpets. It’s like a bad day in the newborn nursery, a little bit. And, since my last post, It has been pretty much the same two showing up to blow their hepatic little horns every day. Um, I don’t think bili lights are going to help them turn pink, orange, red, or purple. The warmth of the sunshine, however, is beginning to bring a bigger rainbow of color to my daylily garden. (Did I mention that I’m a nurse-midwife)

Dream Keeper 6.16.22

So, today my first Ned Roberts spider opened her eyes. Dream Keeper. Definitely not a jaundiced (yellow) trumpet. I love my Neds. My Southwest Road Trip Garden is moving slowly – only 20 scapes for 70+ cultivators so far. It’s that window where it could be the cold, dry, windy spring is just delaying the scapes or it eliminated them altogether. My other gardens have a higher percentage of scapes (unusual timing) but also get more water, so IDK yet.

Anyway, I mentioned I wanted to highlight a few of my non-daylily flowers this summer. So, here we go. Definitely, not all jaundiced trumpets.

Happy Birthday, Colorado!

Today is Colorado Day! My home state is 145 years old today! I remember when it was 100 and I was 21, but we won’t go there.

Today, before my one premier, I want to talk about my CO namesake daylilies. I am going to start with Cripple Creek, because she was in bloom today.

Cripple Creek on Colorado Day, 8.1.21
Echo Canyon – blooming earlier this year. There are several Echo Canyons in CO, so it is a guess that Ned Roberts named her with Colorado in mind.
Glen Eyrie in bloom last week. That name is Colorado through and through.
Mesa Verde – in bloom earlier this month and also 100% Colorado. We were there last weekend, actually.
Rocky Mountain Pals was named for a healthcare team in Colorado.
The Colorado Kid – our name sake. Definite Colorado ties here!

That’s a nice batch of daylilies to celebrate Colorado’s 145th BD.

Now, on to our (likely) next to last premier. I only have Adios Albuquerque left unless we get an August Surprise. I love Navajo Curls. She looks like melting butter to me. An awesome late bloomer with a ton of buds.

Navajo Curls premier 8.1.1

I’m blogged out for the moment but I will be back after a short break – later this week. Despite having over 2 dozen in bloom today, we have a lot of finales brewing.

July Daylily Roundup A-M

The next two posts are a listing of the daylilies that have bloomed ANYTIME during July – even if they started in June. It is a large list but also a colorful one. I believe only 3 of my cultivators were totally done in June – Saratoga Springtime, Scorpio and yellow Stella de Oro.

If you like Ned Roberts cultivators, you have come to the right place because I have about 70 of them, and most (except Navajo Curls and Adios Albuquerque) that are going to bloom the year have bloomed sometime during July.

I went to the rodeo here last night, so I am all practiced-up and ready to go.

Alabama Jubilee 6.26-7.10
All American Chief 6.22-7.9
Apache Bandana 6.30-7.10
Autumn Jewels 7.16-present
Aztec Firebird 7.8-7.31
Baby Blue Eyes 7.6-7.27
Baja 7.10-7.29
Bella Boo 7.2-7.16
Bela Lugosi 7.4-7.26
Big Red Rhyme (NOID) 6.22-7.11
Black Arrowhead 7.6-7.30
Blackthorne 7.6-7.13
Black Eyed Susan 7.4-7.19
Black Ice 7.4-7.18
Blue Beat 7.9-7.17
Buttered Popcorn 7.7-7-25
Candy Cane Dreams 7.1-7.19
Canyon Colors 6.15-present
Catherine Irene 6.24-7.13
Chaco 6.27-present
Cheddar Cheese 7.3-7.17
Cherokee Star 7.9-8.1
Cheyenne Eyes 7.6-7.19
Chief Four Fingers 6.12-7.15
Chokecherry Mountain 7.5-7.27
Chorus Line 7.6-presend
Classy Lady 7.6-7.29
Coburg Fright Wig 7.11-7.30
Comanche Princess 6.18-7.11
Coral Taco 7.2-7.16
Cricket Call 7.3-7.17
Cripple Creek 7.19-present
Dancing Maiden 7.16-present
Desert Icicle 7.26-present
Dr Doom 7.30-present
Dream Catcher 7.14-present
Dream Keeper 6.11-7.1
Early Bird Cardinal 6.27-7.13
Echo Canyon 6.21-7.10
El Desperado 7.17-present
Fairytale Pink 7.11-7.17
Feather Woman 7.5-7.9
Fine Time Lucille 7.10-7.17
Fol de Rol 7.4-7.17
Fooled Me 7.10-7.16
Frans Hals 7.15-present
“Fringe Benefit” 6.27-7.12 (mislabeled bonus)
Funny Valentine 6.20-7.8
Ghost Ranch 7.12-7.17
Glen Eyrie 7.25-7.30 (started while I was on vaca 7.19-24)

Golden Eclipse 7.16-present

Happy Hopi 7.7-7.31
Happy Returns 6.27-7.12
Heavenly Curls 7.5-7.17
Heirloom Heaven 7.25-present
Hesperus 7.12-present
Holy Sombrero 7.7-7.25
Hopi Jewel 6.27-7.17
Iktomi 7.9-7.29
Indian Love Call 7.13-7.27
Indian Sky 7.13-present
Indian Giver 6.30-7.17
Inwood 6.22-7.12
Jungle Queen 7.1-7.19-24? Finished during vacation
Just Plumb Happy 7.4-7.15
Kachina Dancer 6.30-7.16
Kokopelli 6.25-7.19
Lacy Doily 7.3-7.16
Lady Fingers 6.23-7.19
Land of Enchantment 6.23-7.11
Lime Frost 7.11-7.16
Lobo Lucy 7.13-7.31
Longlesson Showoff 7.5.7.18
Lullaby Baby 7.7 to present
Mama Cuna 7.11-present
Marque Moon 7.13-7.19 (ended 7.19-7.24 during vaca)
Mauna Loa 6.27-7.10
Maya Cha Cha 7.4-7.19
Medicine Feather 7.5-7.18
Melon Balls 7.6-7.15
Mesa Verde 6.15-7.13
Mini Pearl 6.26-7.31
Mount Echo Sunrise 6.28-7.19

July Round-up N-Z – click here for more beautiful July blooms!

Please contact my business – Art and Nature from the Hartt for sales questions/availability.

. . . And Washed the Spiders Out

Today, the rain came. And, our predicted high is only 77 today. What a shift after 90 something degrees every day. It will stairstep back up by Saturday, but next week (when we are camping) it looks like it only gets above 90 a couple of times.

The walk through the garden was in drizzle. I didn’t use my cellphone at all for fear of getting water in the charging port. My camera is more resilient to moisture. Some flowers were like the cellphone – sort of weighed down by the rain. Thin man was on the ground, passed out. I had to tie him up. Other cultivators seemed to come to life with brighter colors – doing a rain dance.

Dream Catcher 7.14 – premier bloom today in the rain. But, not such an itsy bitsy spider!

And, there were only 54 cultivators in bloom today. Only 1 premier – Dream Catcher. A nice Ned Roberts spider that was one of my 3 pilot daylilies in the Southwest Garden, along with Kokopelli and Aztec Firebird. Interestingly, those are three that grew pretty well in the ground with the tree roots, and all. Not sure if they like the pots as well yet.

Soksabai, my 16 YO calico kitty, has to come help me inspect daylilies every morning. Even in the rain.

Speaking of Ned Roberts, I have had the chance to chat with his wife and daughter via Facebook recently. They live about 5 hours away from me. I need to meet them sometime – they want to come see my garden.

Art and Nature From the Hartt – Succulent Painting Coaster Tile

Today is a good day for a short blog. I think I will try painting a begonia today. Yesterday, I finished my succulent. I will get back to daylilies – just trying to challenge myself a little. Remember to watch for the announcement when our Etsy store opens. I plan to have daylily fans available in limited number this fall . . . plus the artwork!

Enchantment in the Garden

A spellbinding magic show that brings you delight and pleasure . . . that is what it means to be enchanted. New Mexico is the Land of Enchantment. I am perhaps less enchanted with New Mexico than I am Arizona because Western Colorado has areas that resemble New Mexico.

Yucca in a drift at White Sands National Monument

That said, I am enchanted by my roadtrips through New Mexico. The badlands are beautiful, and the cultural flavor is richer than Colorado – if you are into the Southwest.

The stark horizon at White Sands National Monument, NM

Last year, we saw different side of New Mexico at White Sands National Monument. It is a landscape so boring that it is enchanting. Non-colored sand with a few resilient plants poking their heads through.

This view reminds me of the ski slopes in Colorado – White Sands National Monument

The hikes are like marching through a very hilly sand box. My cats would likely like it better than my dogs, who considered it way too hot at 85 degrees. I had never seen dunes quite like these ones . . . enchanting.

Kachina, Sazi, and Maizzy feeling the heat at White Sands National Monument

So, my vicarious roadtrip daylily of the day is Land of Enchantment – another Ned Roberts spider. Last year was her first year to bloom in my yard and by golly, she does look a bit like the New Mexico State flag.

Land of Enchantment daylily – 2019

She was one of my early bloomers last year. She doesn’t have scapes yet – but I do have 15 cultivators with their weird claw hands being raised to the heavens in prep for a bloom.

Land of Enchantment daylily – 2019

I am nervous because drought years tend to bring early blooming but poor bloom rates. I try to keep up with watering, but I am not the same as a good monsoon. And, the monsoons are too late – it is really the March-May water that matters.

Land of Enchantment daylily 2019

I did put in a new drip system out in the walkway garden and the plants are bigger. So, I guess we will wait to see how enchanting this summer is in the garden. 2020 has brought my 65th birthday, a dead furnace, a broken sewer mainline and COVID-19. I could use a little enchantment.

Pueblo Dancer

“My mom just painted a mural on the neighbor’s garage,” my daughter told the friend she was chatting with on the phone.  The year was 1998 and I had just purchased my home, which came with murals on the garage.  I live on a split lot, so the side of my neighbor’s garage is also my back fence.  It never occurred to me that was wrong to paint it.  In fact, I am likely helping preserve the old wood building by keeping it painted.

Mural2016

The murals in 2016 (and a few daylilies)

I knew I wanted a Southwest feel, so I took a Native American pot off my fireplace (BTW, five moves and 22 years later it is back on the mantel) and painted the Monument Valley design that was on the pot across the top of the mural.

Mural2018

Mural 2018 – still looks pretty good.  The year I added the orchids.

I moved away in 1998, but came back in 2006.  The mural was still there, although weathered – so I revitalized it then.

mural2020strippedpaint

The mural in 2020 after stripping loose paint off.  

It wasn’t until 2011 that I revitalized it, again.  This time, I added a Native American Pueblo off some artwork on my wall.   Now, anyone who knows the Southwest knows I am mixing my metaphors on that mural.  Monument Valley does not have Native America pueblos.  But, oh well, the original mural on the garage is the Senora desert.  It is like a collage of my spring road trip right in my own back yard.

Mural2020primer

The mural site with primer – 2020 (yesterday)

The paint was curling bad this spring.  It looked as bad as I have seen it.  Maybe it’s cause I have my orchids under the shade sail against part of the wall, so it stays more humid.

Mural2020

Mural looks as good as new today!

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Another section of the mural now has my dogs added.

Anyway, I stripped it down to wood where the paint was peeling and used primer to help hold the paint down better.  It was a project that took all weekend.  Well, I added my dogs, and that took time.  And, I am working on a new Native American powwow dancer for the other wall.

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Next week, I will finish the dancer and add some hoodoos from Goblin Valley to the area that has the dogs.  Hopefully, it won’t take all weekend.

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New painting will be a likeness of this young dancer

Pueblo Dancer is the name of a daylily in my Southwest garden.  I have had her several years, she came with a bunch of Ned Roberts daylilies.  The only thing is, I think she is mislabeled because she was suppose to be a tall daylily, and she is not.

PuebloDancer6.28.3

“Pueblo Dancer” in my yard – 2018

She doesn’t look like that much the pictures of the cultivator, Pueblo Dancer.  I would love anyone’s input on who she really is – or is she herself? Maybe she just isn’t happy in my yard?  At any rate, next weekend, I will be adding this Native American dancer to the mural near the pueblo.  A new pueblo dancer to replace the peeled one.

PUEBLO_DANCER_medium

Picture of Pueblo Dancer from Shady Rest Gardens

I have to thank the stay-at home (and COVID-19) for helping me to find my creative side.  I do better with a schedule I can flex.  It is just how creatives are.

Adios, Albuquerque

This year, there was no spring break road trip – adios, Albuquerque.  Adios to the best week of the year.  Adios to the canyons of the Southwest.  The only novel adventure this year is named Corona – and I don’t mean the arch in Utah.

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Petroglyph National Monument HQ – 2014

Albuquerque is about 6-8 hours down US Hwy 550.  In fact, that highway starts in Montrose and ends in Albuquerque.

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Petroglyph National Monument near Albuquerque, NM – 2014

When I think of Albuquerque, I think of my 2014 road trip with my new dog, Maizzy, and my new Honda Fit, Mini Pearl.  I had plans for Chaco Canyon and for Route 66, and what lie in between was a mystery – my choice of which way to turn on the open road.  The first couple of years, I didn’t get reservations until the day I left the previous motel.  More dogs = more planning.

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Petroglyph National Monument – 2014

I don’t like cities, so I was zooming as quickly as I could from US Hwy 550 to I-40 (Route 66) when I noticed a sign for Petroglyph National Monument.  I was like – “Well, that sounds interesting”, so off I went.  There was a dog friendly section where we hiked until mid afternoon.

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Maizzy – my non-desert dog in the desert at Petroglyph National Monument

Road trips through the Southwest are geology on wheels.  I found these petroglyphs stunning because they were on volcanic rock and not red sandstone like I am use to.  This one looks like Charlie Brown with a baseball cap to me.

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Charlie Brown Petroglyph and Petroglyph National Monument

 

From there, we headed west on I-40.  I saw signs for El Malpias National Monument, so we stopped there for a short scenic drive.  It was like a combo of volcanic rock and red sandstone.  I realized they what I realize most everyday of every road trip – that I play too long and run out of time before I want to stop.

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El Malpias National Monument – 2014

The other cool place near Albuquerque is Salinas Mission Pueblos National Monument.  We didn’t run into these 2016.  That was another serendipity where we were on a stretch of highway with nothing to do between point A and point B – then there was this photo on the wall of ruins – and I had to find them.

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Maizzy at Salinas Mission Pueblo Ruins – 2016

Last year, our trip took us through that area, again – so I went with all three dogs.  I love the big old mission buildings as a background for my small dogs.

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Kachina, Sazi, and Maizzy at Salinas Mission Pueblo Ruins National Monument – 2019

These trips to me are Albuquerque – unique in culture and landscape.  Adios Albuquerque was added to my daylily garden in 2016, I think.  After these trips that are forever engraved in my memory.  I put it in my Southwest garden with (mostly) other Ned Roberts spiders.

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Adios Albuquerque daylily – 2019

The garden was put in where there was only rock garden – on the easement between the sidewalk and the street.  I have no back yard, because it is a split lot – so I actually have almost all of these daylilies in buried pots in case the water main ever busts there.

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Adios Albuquerque daylily – 2019

I like the bloom – it is subtle.  Albuquerque was Ned’s home until he moved to Colorado for treatment – at least that is my understanding.  He, no doubt, loved the New Mexico culture.  It is different from Colorado . . . it must have been hard for him to say Adios, Albuquerque.  Fortunately, I have his daylilies to take me on a road trip on the year of the pandemic.

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Adios Albuquerque daylily 2019